The Complexity of Obesity

People generally assume that obesity is strictly the product of bad choices about physical activity and diet. That kind of thinking gets in the way of dealing with obesity as a health condition.

Obesity is a very complicated condition. About 50 to 70% of one’s risk of obesity is genetically determined. You can make choices that make it better or worse, but that’s just like any other chronic disease. When the blame and shame that is so common gets in the way, it makes it hard to improve the health of people living with obesity.

A lot of health plans have broad, blanket exclusions for obesity, thinking that it is a cosmetic condition. However, the rise in the prevalence of obesity over the last 3 decades has made it clear that it’s creating a burden of chronic disease ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes to many cancers.

Because weight-based stereotypes and prejudice so often come from thinking that obesity is caused and sustained by personal characteristics such as laziness or lack of willpower, there is a need for increased public awareness and education about the complex biology of obesity and the significant obstacles present in efforts to achieve sustainable weight loss. The prevailing societal and media messages that reinforce blame on obese persons need to be replaced with messages that obesity is a chronic disease with a complex etiology. Obesity is a lifelong condition for most people who are overweight or obese.

Several studies have consistently demonstrated that experiencing weight stigma increases the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy eating behaviors and lower levels of physical activity, both of which exacerbate obesity and weight gain. Among youths, studies have demonstrated that overweight children who experience weight-based teasing are more likely to engage in binge eating and unhealthy weight-control behaviors compared with overweight peers who are not teased, even after control for variables such as BMI and socioeconomic status. 

Other research has consistently documented a positive association between weight-based victimization and eating disorder symptoms and bulimia. Weight-based victimization among overweight youths has been linked to lower levels of physical activity, negative attitudes about sports, and lower participation in physical activity among overweight students.

If you’re looking for treatment for this very real, physical disease, contact VipSurg for an appointment. Our expert team understands the complexity of obesity and all the issues that come with it. We can help find the right treatment for you.

Doctor writing word OBESITY with marker, Medical concept

Eating Your Way to Healthy Blood Pressure

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, affects 1 in 3 American adults and can lead to significant health problems such as heart attack, stroke, heart or kidney failure, and more. Most doctors prescribe medication along with a healthy diet and exercise for this condition, but researchers are finding that some foods are better than others at helping control blood pressure.

You may know that excessive salt in your diet can raise blood pressure, but are you aware of the benefits of having enough potassium, magnesium, and fiber in your diet? Fruits and vegetables are high in these beneficial minerals and fiber and are naturally low in sodium. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, people with hypertension may especially benefit from upping the amount of potassium in their diet. Adults should get at least 4,700 milligrams a day. A few good sources: bananas (422 milligrams each), a baked potato with skin (738 milligrams), orange juice (496 milligrams per cup), and nonfat or low-fat yogurt (531–579 milligrams per 8 ounces).

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan has been proven to lower blood pressure in studies sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. In addition to being a low salt (or low sodium) plan, the DASH diet provides additional benefits to reduce blood pressure. It is based on an eating plan rich in fruits and vegetables, and low-fat or non-fat dairy, with whole grains. It is a high fiber, low to moderate fat diet, rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Some delicious choices for increasing these beneficial minerals and fiber include apples, bananas, carrots, grapes, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, tuna, and yogurt. 

Dr. Tsuda and Dr. Ryan can provide you with nutritional guidance if necessary. They can help you find the right treatment to reduce the health risks of high blood pressure and other dangerous metabolic disorders that often accompany obesity. Call 702-487-6000 for a consultation.

Vegetables and High Blood Pressure

Aging and Obesity: Is Bariatric Surgery an Option for the Elderly Patient?

The good news is that improved life expectancy is allowing baby boomers to enter their golden years in unprecedented numbers. The bad news is that rates of obesity among this aging demographic are climbing in never-before-seen numbers as well, putting this population at risk of developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes, lower extremity arthritis, sleep apnea, and stroke, all of which can lead to disability. Treatment guidelines to lose weight in the elderly have been difficult to define, yet it is very clear that obesity in the elderly contributes to worsening of multiple parameters which along with the metabolic problems mentioned already, include cognition, functionality and quality of life. While ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of weight-loss aka bariatric surgery in the general adult population, more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older.

Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; this is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population.

The risk of any surgical intervention increases as one gets older. However, weight-loss surgery is very safe, and the potential benefits routinely outweigh any of the associated risks if there are no other health issues that would dramatically increase the risk of surgery.

Ideally, a comprehensive assessment would focus on psychosocial and functional status in addition to physical data. An excellent support system of family, friends, or caregiver resources is imperative. The selected patient should be capable of engaging in physical interventions focusing on mitigating muscle loss and osteoporosis and of maintaining changes in eating behavior as needed as well. A recommended “pre-habilitation” program may include a physical therapist to assist with strength and endurance training and a nutritionist to aide in enhancing protein intake, vitamin D, and other nutrient sufficiency.

Identifying goals of care, quality of life, and improved function should be considered as primary objectives of undergoing surgery. Goals of the surgery include not only weight loss but also improvements in physiological function, comorbidity, and quality of life, and reduction in institutionalization.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, VIPSurg is here to help. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Old obese woman walking with stick

 

 

 

Benefits of Bariatric Surgery: More than Just Weight Loss

Do you think you’d eat less if you felt full after eating just a small amount of food? That’s exactly what bariatric surgery does. That’s why people lose weight and keep it off after weight-loss surgery. Bariatric surgery reduces the stomach’s storage capacity, limiting food intake and helping you feel full much sooner than usual.

There are several types of bariatric surgery. Options include gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and gastric banding. Your doctor can help determine if you’re a candidate for one of these procedures, and, if so, which surgery is best for you.

Losing weight and keeping it off is extremely important for mitigating the potential health problems associated with obesity. You must keep the weight off for a minimum of five years to consider weight loss a success and one that can result in potentially lifesaving benefits resulting in a healthier you.

Benefits of sustained weight loss through bariatric surgery include:

  • Long-term remission for type 2 diabetes. A recent Cleveland Clinic study suggests that bariatric surgery causes long-term remission of difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes. The results of this study show the procedure is highly effective for obese patients with type 2 diabetes, allowing almost all patients to remain free of insulin and adjunct medications for at least three years after surgery.
  • Improved cardiovascular health. Weight loss surgery decreases a person’s risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral heart disease. Blood pressure and cholesterol levels can return to normal, or near normal after surgery, reducing these risks and improving overall well-being, 
  • Relief of depression. Many obese people feel depressed because of poor body image and social stigma. Even younger people who carry significant excess weight find it difficult to participate in activities they might otherwise enjoy, leading to social isolation and depression. Losing this excess weight can improve emotional health in these patients.
  • Eliminate obstructive sleep apnea. Achieving and sustaining a normal weight range often allows people with sleep apnea to stop using a CPAP machine at bedtime.
  • Joint pain relief. Carrying around excessive weight puts a lot of stress on your weight-bearing joints, often causing chronic pain and joint damage. The significant and sustained weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery relieves the stress on joints and often allows people to stop using pain medications and enjoy much more mobility, 
  • Improve fertility. Weight loss surgery can also improve fertility during childbearing years.
  • Alleviate other medical conditions. Weight loss surgery can alleviate metabolic syndrome, pregnancy complications, gallbladder disease, and more.

To learn more about bariatric surgery and if it might be right for you, contact VIPSurg for a consultation. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can help find the proper treatment for your unique situation.

Woman power! Strong confident women.

Let’s Not Sugar Coat It – Carbs Get a Bad Rap

Over the past few years, carbohydrates, especially refined sugar, have gotten a bad reputation. Unfortunately, an “all-or-nothing” restriction could be causing many people to eventually binge on these foods, often leading to weight gain and the problems that accompany obesity. Despite the messages in the media about the dangers of carbs and sugars, it is important to remember that not all carbohydrates are bad.

As a matter of fact, to boost your metabolism and ultimately lose weight, one must incorporate good carbs into their daily diet. Good carbs provide vital nutrients and essential fibers and help you stay full.

What are good carbs?

Good carbs are complex carbs that provide energy and nutritional value. For example, whole grains like quinoa, barley, faro, brown rice, and vegetables like sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts, or artichokes. Whole grain breads and pastas are easy to incorporate into your diet. These foods will keep you energized for a long period of time and are a healthy staple to any meal.

What are bad carbs?

Bad carbs are refined carbs, often filled with added sugar and devoid of nutritional photo-1458938354258-3e66eb36eb7bvalue. Examples of these would include foods containing refined grains like white rice and foods containing white flour like bread, pasta, and pastries. Bad carbs will provide temporary relief of hunger, but since the nutritional value is so low, the feeling of fullness is short-lived.

Remember, carbs do have their value, and that value should not be underestimated. Whole grains are reliable suppliers of energy; they take longer to break down than refined carbs, and they help make you feel fuller and more satisfied. Whole-grain carbs, when taken in the right portions, are not usually the issue when it comes to weight gain.

Also remember that no diet is perfect. While a well-balanced diet should predominantly include complex carbohydrates, eating simple carbohydrates in moderation will not necessarily make you gain weight or cause chronic diseases.

According to the American Heart Association, women should have no more than six teaspoons of sugar a day and men should have no more than nine. Consuming large amounts of refined sugar is hard on your whole body. It can cause weight gain, high cholesterol, and diabetes, but it also effects mood, sleep, skin, and digestion.

If you are looking for ways to treat severe obesity, schedule a consultation at VIPSurg. Our doctors are experts at bariatric surgery and can help find the right treatment for you.

The Link Between Seasonal Allergies and Reflux

While many may think of seasonal allergies happening in the spring along with blooming flowers, fall can also be a difficult time for those who are allergic. Ragweed, dust, mold, mildew, and the removal of fall crops are just some of the possible fall triggers for allergy sufferers. What many people don’t know is that allergies can be a big issue for people dealing with acid reflux disease. Separate from food allergies, seasonal allergies can also play a role in exacerbating the symptoms of acid reflux.

The link between seasonal allergies and acid reflux disease is that as allergic response becomes more active, one has more nasal drip, and more nasal drip leads to more acid, and that acid can then reflux up into the nasal passages and make the whole cycle even worse. In addition, one of the ways that seasonal allergies can aggravate acid reflux disease is the pressure from coughing or sneezing. This pressure can temporarily weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and allow stomach contents to splash into the esophagus. In order to get the added acid reflux pain under control, suffers also need to get the drainage, sneezing and coughing under control.

The first line of defense in the seasonal allergy arsenal is generally the use of antihistamines. Medications provide a way to lessen the reaction the body has to the histamines produced by allergies. These medications can help many people deal with their allergies without any further treatments.

Senior man with reflux

If you do need antihistamines in the pollen season, remember that they can dehydrate and cause constipation. The latter is also a huge reflux trigger. Be sure to drink plenty of water and gradually increase your fiber intake to counteract any unpleasant side effects. You don’t want to trade one reflux trigger for another.

There are a few things that you can do this time of year to help lessen your increased acid reflux symptoms due to allergies:

  • Even though the weather this time of year can be gorgeous, keep the windows closed in at least one room of your house. Spending time in this room throughout the day will give your entire bodily system a break from the environmental stress being placed on it.
  • Shower and change clothes after working or being outside. Most aller
    gens cannot be seen. Especially on a windy day, just assume that if you have been outside, you are wearing allergens when you come inside.
  • Be proactive with your reflux medication and your allergy medication this time of year. Reflux comes in waves. One of the best ways to manage reflux is to understand ahead of time when your reflux may be troublesome and manage accordingly. An antihistamine can be helpful. It works by blocking a certain natural substance (histamine) that your body makes during an allergic reaction. This medication can also slow down your runny nose and nasal drip whichin turn can help your reflux symptoms.
  • Do not experiment with new foods. Keep your eating very simple and reflux friendly until at least the first frost in your area.
  • Avoid raw fruits and vegetables. Allergens can be found in our environment and also in raw fruits and some vegetables. These same foods can often be better tolerated cooked. When foods are heated, the proteins are distorted and the immune system no longer recognizes the food as a problem.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are suffering from acid reflux. Schedule a consultation at VIP Surg. We can help find the right treatment for you.