Sugary Beverages and Their Role in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

These days, soft drinks are the beverage of choice for millions of Americans and others around the world. Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which include soft drinks, fruit drinks, iced tea, and energy and vitamin water drinks has risen across the globe. In addition to the obvious drawback of weight gain, higher consumption of SSBs is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

In the U.S. between the late 1970s and 2006, the per capita consumption of SSBs increased from 64.4 to 141.7 kcal/day, representing more than a twofold increase. Of particular concern is the rapid trajectory of increase evident in many developing countries where access to SSBs has grown right along with rising rates of urbanization. Sales figures from Coca Cola’s 2007 annual report show that during 2007, India and China experienced growths of 14 and 18%, respectively, in the volume of beverages sold, showing substantial increases in sales at the population level.

According to the World Health Association (WHO), metabolic syndrome and diabetes are responsible for 19 million deaths each year. Knowing that sugar consumption is associated with these conditions, the public should take steps to reduce their intake.

People who regularly consume 1 to 2 cans or more of sugary drinks per day have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely have such drinks.

A study that followed 40,000 men for two decades found that those who averaged one can of a sugary beverage per day had a 20% higher risk of having a heart attack or dying from a heart attack than men who rarely consumed sugary drinks. A related study in women found a similar sugary beverage–heart disease link.

People who drink a lot of sugary drinks often tend to weigh more and perhaps eat less healthfully than people who don’t drink sugary drinks. However, studies show that having an otherwise healthy diet or being at a healthy weight only slightly lessens the risks associated with drinking SSBs.

Because SSBs are often consumed in large amounts and tend to raise blood glucose and soda and computer and phoneinsulin concentrations rapidly and dramatically, they have been shown to contribute to a high dietary glycemic load. High glycemic load diets induce glucose intolerance and insulin resistance particularly among overweight individuals and can increase levels of inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein, which are linked to type 2 diabetes risk.

The exact amount of sugar intake that increases the risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome is still unknown at this point. Nevertheless, medical experts agree that consuming large amounts of sugar poses a health threat. But how much sugar intake per day is considered too much? The WHO recommends no more than 9 teaspoons per day for men and 6 teaspoons per day for women.

The message is to be careful about the amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages you drink, and be mindful of sugar content. Prolonged intake of high amounts of sugar can contribute to metabolic syndrome onset with time. Lowering sugar-sweetened beverage and sugar intake should form part of a multi-pronged approach to living a healthy lifestyle which includes increased exercise, a balanced diet, and lower stress levels.

If you are in the Las Vegas area and are suffering from the problems associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, call VIP Surg at 702-487-6000. Dr. Tsuda and his team can team of experts can help.

 

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Does your Diet Support your Warm-Weather Exercise Regimen?

Spring is here, and you might be changing up your fitness routine with warm weather in mind. However, just taking your exercise outside and hydrating more might not cut it for your new regimen. You need to properly fuel your body for the exercise you are doing.

Whether you’re training for fat-loss, a race personal best or just fun, how you fuel your body around the clock – not just immediately before or after exercise – affects your workouts. Try to avoid starving and then feasting; just stay fed by regularly eating while you’re awake. By eating regularly throughout the day, you can largely eliminate the need to worry about dedicated pre- and post-workout meals. Just schedule your workout between your regular meals.

Americans are notorious for getting the bulk of their protein intake at dinner. However, 2014 research published in the Journal of Nutrition shows that simply distributing your regular protein intake more evenly throughout the day improves the body’s ability to build lean muscle. Whatever your sport or workout goal, having healthy levels of muscle will help you reach it. Eat at least 25 to 30 grams of protein per meal. And, remember, those meals should be frequent.

It is important to boost your hydration factor. Most of us are chronically dehydrated, which can take a toll on your ability to focus and concentrate when exercising, and it can impair your strength and power. Research in the Journal of Athletic Training also shows that dehydration can worsen post-exercise muscle soreness. During exercise, aim to drink 6 to 8 ounces of water every 15 to 30 minutes. Ideally, when you finish your workout, your weight should be no more than 2 percent less than your starting weight. Any additional losses in weight point to significant dehydration.

Cutting down on packaged foods and focusing on nature-made foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy and meats is also important. Put junk in, and you can expect to get junk out.

Whatever your exercise goals or routines, know that you can’t out-exercise a bad diet. After all, food is fuel. Without the right fuel in the tank, you’re not going to get where you want to go.

If you’re in the Las Vegas area and are interested in weight-loss surgery, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He can help you find the perfect treatment for your situation.Screen Shot 2017-04-10 at 11.19.07 AM

Gastric Bypass for a Longer Life

According to research by the Geisinger Health System, one of the largest health service organizations in the U.S., patients with severe obesity who have gastric bypass surgery reduce their risk of dying from obesity and other diseases by 48% up to 10 years after surgery, compared to similar patients who do not undergo the procedure. This is significant considering that the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimates about 24 million Americans have severe obesity, which would mean a BMI of 35 or more with an obesity-related condition like diabetes or a BMI of 40.

Researchers from the Geisinger Health System followed nearly 2,700 patients who had gastric bypass at the system’s nationally accredited bariatric surgery center between 2004 and 2014. Mortality benefits began to emerge within two years after surgery and were significant within four years. The biggest reduction in risk occurred in patients 60 years or older at the time of surgery and in patients who had diabetes before surgery.

“The long-term survival benefits these older patients and those with diabetes experience likely relate to improvements in long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health, among other risk factors,” said Michelle R. Lent, Ph.D., a Geisinger Obesity Institute researcher. “While this study did not evaluate specific-cause mortality, as expected, we did find significant improvements or remission in diabetes and high blood pressure.”

In the study, more than 60 percent of patients with diabetes before surgery experienced diabetes remission about five years after surgery. Previous studies have shown death from heart disease and even certain cancers are lower in gastric bypass patients than patients with severe obesity who do not have the operation.

People with obesity and severe obesity have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis, sleep apnea, high blood pressure and dozens of other diseases and conditions. Studies have shown individuals with a BMI greater than 30 have a 50 to 100 percent greater risk of premature death compared to healthy weight individuals.Live Longer

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are interested in learning what bariatric surgery can do for you, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team of experts can help you choose the best treatment for your unique situation.

 

Instead of Making Yourself Over this Year Make Over your Resolutions

The new year is here, and if you are like many, many people you’ve made resolutions about how you’re going to lose weight, exercise regularly, and generally live a healthier lifestyle starting now. Of course, these are all noble goals; unfortunately the hordes of people who will be back to their old ways by the end of the month far outnumber those who keep true to their intentions.

Perhaps the top reason that well-meaning “resolution-ers” fail is that the goals they set for themselves are unrealistic and set up to fail from the beginning. This year, instead of making over yourself, here are some tips to makeover your resolutions. This year, resolve to be successful!

Old resolution: I am going to lose weight—somehow. Making list of New Year's resolutions
People often will just set a weight-loss goal, but they don’t have a good plan on how to get there. Without a detailed plan, you’re likely to go back to previous eating and exercise patterns.
Makeover: Set a goal that is specific, measurable, realistic, and trackable. Walk for 15 minutes three times a week or add a serving each of fruits and vegetables. Focus on changes that you can make a part of your lifestyle seamlessly, so you’ll be able to sustain them for the long term.

Old resolution: That’s it, no more chocolate—ever!
Banning your favorite treat—whether it’s chocolate, soda, lattes, or french fries– is bound to backfire. Dieters often eat it, binge on it, feel bad, and then throw in the towel and revert back to their old eating patterns.
Makeover: Make peace with your trigger foods. Don’t have them at home staring you in the face, but allow yourself to have them once or twice a week.

Old resolution: Those holiday parties went straight to my hips. I’m going to have to starve
myself to undo the damage.
Too often when somebody says diet, they’re thinking deprivation. If your weight loss plan feels like a drag, you’re going to feel punished and abandon it.
Makeover: Rejoice in the lifelong health benefits you’ll be creating instead of getting down about dieting. Losing weight becomes easy when you invest your mental energy in making positive, healthy changes for yourself.

Drastic resolutions are simply not realistic. You’ll just get discouraged and give up. Instead, make some basic alterations to your lifestyle. These changes don’t all have to happen at once, but changes in what you eat, when you eat it, and how much you move your body will ultimately cause you to lose the weight. People who aren’t willing to change their lifestyle will never be successful with weight loss.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are ready to change your lifestyle and do what it takes to finally be successful with weight loss, schedule an appointment with Dr, Shawn Tsuda. He and his expert team can help find the right treatment for you.

 

 

Weighty Misperceptions

People generally assume that obesity is strictly a matter of personal choices, the product of bad choices about physical activity and diet. That kind of thinking gets in the way of actually dealing with obesity as a health condition.

Obesity is a very complicated condition. About 50 to 70% of one’s risk of obesity is genetically determined. You can make choices that make it better or worse, but that’s just like any other chronic disease. When the blame and shame that is so common gets in the way, it makes it hard to actually improve the health of people living with obesity.

A lot of health plans have had broad, blanket exclusions for obesity, thinking that it is a cosmetic condition. However, the rise in the prevalence of obesity that’s happened over the last 3 decades has made it clear that it’s creating a burden of chronic disease ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes to many cancers.

Because weight-based stereotypes and prejudice so often emerge from attributions that obesity is caused and maintained by personal characteristics such as laziness or lack of willpower, there is a clear need for increased public awareness and education about the complex biology of obesity and the significant obstacles present in efforts to achieve sustainable weight loss. The prevailing societal and media messages that reinforce blame on obese persons need to be replaced with messages that obesity is a chronic disease with a complex etiology, and is a lifelong condition for most obese persons.

A number of studies have consistently demonstrated that experiencing weight stigma a fat man with a big belly holding scalesincreases the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy eating behaviors and lower levels of physical activity, both of which exacerbate obesity and weight gain. Among youths, several studies have demonstrated that overweight children who experience weight-based teasing are more likely to engage in binge-eating and unhealthy weight control behaviors compared with overweight peers who are not teased, even after control for variables such as BMI and socioeconomic status. Other research has consistently documented a positive association between weight-based victimization and eating disorder symptoms and bulimia. Weight-based victimization among overweight youths has been linked to lower levels of physical activity, negative attitudes about sports, and lower participation in physical activity among overweight students.

If you’re looking for treatment for this very real, physical disease, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for an appointment. Our expert team understands the complexity of obesity and all of the issues that come with it. We can help find the right treatment for you.

 

The Skinny on Diet and Nutrition Myths

False news is a popular topic these days, but it’s really nothing new. We’ve been inundated with “information” that is so far from accurate about so many things, and among them, diet and nutrition just might be the most myth-filled subject of all. Here are some truths to help you make healthy decisions:

Myth: Grain products such as bread, pasta, and rice are fattening. I should avoid them when trying to lose weight.

Fact: A grain product is any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain. Grains are divided into two subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel—the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples include brown rice and whole-wheat bread, cereal, and pasta. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins.

People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet may lower their chances of developing some chronic diseases. Government dietary guidelines advise making half your grains whole grains. For example, choose 100 percent whole-wheat bread instead of white bread, and brown rice instead of white rice.

Myth: “Low-fat” or “fat-free” means no calories.

Fact: A serving of low-fat or fat-free food may be lower in calories than a serving of the full-fat product, but many processed low-fat or fat-free foods have just as many calories as the full-fat versions of the same foods—or even more calories. These foods may contain added flour, salt, starch, or sugar to improve flavor and texture after fat is removed. These items add calories.

Bread nutrition factsMyth: Eating healthy food costs too much.

Fact: Eating better does not have to cost a lot of money. Many people think that fresh foods are healthier than canned or frozen ones. For example, some people think that fresh spinach is better for you than frozen or canned. However, canned or frozen fruits and vegetables provide as many nutrients as fresh ones, at a lower cost. Healthy options include low-salt canned veggies and fruit canned in its own juice or water-packed. Remember to rinse canned veggies to remove excess salt. Also, some canned seafood, like tuna, is easy to keep on the shelf, healthy, and low-cost. Canned, dried, or frozen beans, lentils, and peas are also healthy sources of protein that are easy on the wallet.

The bottom line: To lose weight, reduce the number of calories you take in and increase the amount of physical activity you do each day. Create and follow a healthy eating plan that replaces less healthy options with a mix of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein, and low-fat dairy:

  • Eat a mix of fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, fruits, veggies, and whole grains.
  • Limit added sugars, cholesterol, sodium, and saturated fat.
  • Eat low-fat protein: beans, eggs, fish, lean meats, nuts, and poultry.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for treatment for obesity and the health issues related to it, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team can help you find the right treatment for you.

 

Try Healthier Versions of Your Favorite Beverages This New Year’s Eve

New Years Eve will be here tomorrow. Do you have a plan for celebrating without sabotaging your plans to live a healthy lifestyle? If you think that staying away from all of the festivities will be the only way to behave yourself, think again! Here are a few ideas for low calorie, healthier cocktails for you to drink while ringing in the new year.

Cocktails can pack a caloric punch when prepared with high-calorie mixers like juice, soda, tonic water, and simple syrup. Keep things light with these skinny drink choices.

If you want a Dirty Martini – (220 to 330 calories)

A better choice: Hot-pepper-infused vodka over ice with an olive (105 calories)

Martinis can be sneaky. A 4-ounce drink has around 220 calories, and many generous bartenders serve martinis in larger glasses. The bigger a drink, the more alcohol it has; therefore, the more calories it has. The addition of olive brine in a dirty martini only adds about 20 extra calories, which isn’t that big of a deal — but the sodium is. It can increase your thirst, which you may try to quench with more alcohol, and it can also make you feel bloated the next day.

If you want a Cosmopolitan – (212 Calories per 4-Ounce Serving)

A better choice: Raspberry-infused vodka with club soda, a splash of cranberry and a lime (115 calories)

A little vodka, a little Cointreau, some cranberry juice—you may as well be sipping a pack of liquefied fruit chews. And the more splashes of juice and shots of alcohol you add, the higher the calories climb.

If you want a Gin and Tonic – (120 to 166 Calories)

A better choice: Equal parts gin and soda water and a splash of tonic (100 to 140 calories)

Tonic water—that bitter-tasting bubbly mixer whose key ingredient, quinine, was once used as an anti-malarial medicine—has almost as many calories and sugar as soda. Cut the quinine beverage with soda water rather than ordering diet tonic (or diet anything) because research suggests zero-calorie artificial sweeteners can throw off the body’s natural response to intense sweetness, which can lead to weight gain.

It is best, of course, to avoid alcohol, but if it doesn’t feel like New Years Eve without a festive cocktail, there are definitely some choices that are better than others. Happy New Year from Dr. Heidi Ryan. Celebrate safely and healthfully!

Champagne cocktail for  New Year and Christmas Celebration