Is Weight-Loss Surgery Right for You?

Weight-loss surgery, also known as bariatric surgery, is a safe and effective treatment for individuals suffering from morbid obesity, a serious health condition that can interfere with basic physical functions such as breathing or walking. Obesity puts people at greater risk for illnesses including diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gallstones, osteoarthritis, heart disease, and cancer.

To be considered morbidly obese, you must have a BMI of 40 or more or be 35 or more and experiencing obesity-related health conditions, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. These are important for qualifying for a bariatric procedure.

People seeking weight-loss surgery are not usually considered candidates unless they have tried and failed to lose weight through traditional forms of treatment. People at high risk for disease or who have a life-threatening condition, including those with a disabling condition from obesity, are often considered good candidates for surgeries such as gastric bypass. People with a genetic condition that causes obesity are candidates as well.

Are you a candidate?

Weight-loss surgery may be right for you if:

  • Your BMI of 40 or more.
  • Your BMI is 35 or higher, and you also suffer from one or more health problem such as Type 2 Diabetes or Hypertension.
  • Your past attempts to lose weight have been unsuccessful.
  • You do not have any other disease that may have caused your obesity.
  • You are prepared to make substantial changes in your eating habits and lifestyle.

Other guidelines can include an extremely high body mass index, obesity that exists for five or more years, no history of alcohol or drug abuse, and no untreated psychiatric disorder. Candidates are typically between the ages of 18 and 65. Certain adolescents may be eligible for weight loss surgery, too.

Being a good candidate means having realistic expectations. Weight-loss surgery can help reduce your risk of life-threatening conditions and improve your overall health and appearance, and these changes should improve your quality of life; however, surgery alone is often not enough to turn your life around. Significant behavior modifications are necessary.

To decide about the gastric bypass procedure and to find out if you are a good candidate for weight loss surgery, talk to the doctors at VIP SURG. Their experts can help you find the right weight-loss treatment for your unique situation.

Bariatric Surgery - medical concept

Aging and Obesity: Is Bariatric Surgery an Option for the Elderly Patient?

The good news is that improved life expectancy is allowing baby boomers to enter their golden years in unprecedented numbers. The bad news is that rates of obesity among this aging demographic are climbing in never-before-seen numbers as well, putting this population at risk of developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes, lower extremity arthritis, sleep apnea, and stroke, all of which can lead to disability. Treatment guidelines to lose weight in the elderly have been difficult to define, yet it is very clear that obesity in the elderly contributes to worsening of multiple parameters which along with the metabolic problems mentioned already, include cognition, functionality and quality of life. While ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of weight-loss aka bariatric surgery in the general adult population, more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older.

Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; this is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population.

The risk of any surgical intervention increases as one gets older. However, weight-loss surgery is very safe, and the potential benefits routinely outweigh any of the associated risks if there are no other health issues that would dramatically increase the risk of surgery.

Ideally, a comprehensive assessment would focus on psychosocial and functional status in addition to physical data. An excellent support system of family, friends, or caregiver resources is imperative. The selected patient should be capable of engaging in physical interventions focusing on mitigating muscle loss and osteoporosis and of maintaining changes in eating behavior as needed as well. A recommended “pre-habilitation” program may include a physical therapist to assist with strength and endurance training and a nutritionist to aide in enhancing protein intake, vitamin D, and other nutrient sufficiency.

Identifying goals of care, quality of life, and improved function should be considered as primary objectives of undergoing surgery. Goals of the surgery include not only weight loss but also improvements in physiological function, comorbidity, and quality of life, and reduction in institutionalization.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, VIPSurg is here to help. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Old obese woman walking with stick

 

 

 

Obesity in America: The Unhealthy Truth

Most Americans are overweight. Most – let that sink in for a minute. The majority of American adults are at least carrying around a few more pounds than is considered healthy. Severe obesity is also on the rise across the country. Unfortunately, these stats tell a story that won’t have a happy ending unless something changes:

  • Nearly 40% of adults and close to 20% of adolescents are obese in America. 
  • A body that is 20% overweight is prone to major health problems. 
  • Life expectancy is greatly reduced in someone who is obese.
  • The obesity problem is growing everywhere, but rural areas tend to have both higher obesity rates and much greater rates of what medical researchers term “severe obesity,” which is a BMI of 40 or more.

The main concern with this alarming trend is that being overweight affects all areas of your health. Carrying around extra weight not only make you feel heavy, but it also contributes to other health problems like sleep apnea, diabetes, high cholesterol, painful joints, and heart disease.

 The good news is that these risk factors can be eliminated by losing weight and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The bad news is that changing behavior long-term is extremely difficult for all but the most committed. For the very obese, even commitment and willpower often aren’t enough.

Eating the wrong foods, eating too much food, lack of exercise, genetics, stress, emotional eating, and a slow metabolism are the major contributing factors in obesity. Nevertheless, even though we are more aware than ever that nutrition and health value should be playing a bigger role in our selections when it comes to choosing what we eat, most Americans surveyed still listed convenience as their number 1 priority when deciding.

Whatever its causes, believing severe obesity can be managed or eliminated by having a low-fat diet and engaging in exercise is a bit naïve. When a person is 50, 70, or 100+ pounds overweight, it can be difficult to impossible to diet and exercise enough to lose the troublesome weight. 

Unfortunately, diet, exercise, and weight-loss pills are generally ineffective for severely obese people. Studies have demonstrated that when the BMI reaches 40, the chances of success with medical therapy for weight loss are approximately 1%. 

Since 1991, the National Institute of Health has supported bariatric surgery as a treatment for morbid obesity when combined with a healthy diet and exercise.

Surgery can help a person lose weight so that they are able to exercise better to maintain a healthy weight loss. Some obese people need weight-loss surgery because, despite drug therapy, exercise, and behavioral modifications, they still have increased risk of comorbid conditions including heart disease and diabetes. These are the people who are often candidates for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery.  

Obesity is a common and complex medical condition, losing weight isn’t easy to do, and there’s really no magic cure. If it were simple, everyone would be healthy and trim. However, if you are at an unhealthy weight, you must start somewhere. Going it alone into a crash diet isn’t a good idea. You will put the weight back on, and chances are you’ll gain even more than you lost. Checking with your doctor, who can advise you on a plan that is safe and right for you, is a good way to begin your journey to a healthier, happier you.  

If you’ve tried diet and exercise but still aren’t losing the weight you need to lose to be healthy, schedule an appointment with VIPSurg. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can help find the right treatment for you.

Lady eats hamburger

Is Obesity a Disease?

Whether or not obesity should be considered a disease is a matter of debate. In 2013, the American Medical Association, the nation’s largest group of physicians, voted to recognize obesity as a disease. The decision was controversial to say the least.

The decision was meant to improve access to weight loss treatment, reduce the stigma of obesity, and underscore the fact that obesity is not always a matter of self-control. Others argue that calling obesity a disease automatically categorizes a large portion of Americans as “sick,” when they may not be. Instead, critics say obesity should be considered a risk factor for many diseases, but not a disease in and of itself.

Experts on one side of the issue say obesity, like alcoholism, depression, and anxiety, is a disease. There are definite medical patterns: hormone imbalances, neurotransmitter deficiencies, and nutritional exhaustion that all contribute to obesity. Many patients that are obese have underlying medical issues that need to be addressed.

On the other hand, with more than one third of the American population presently classified as obese, it is clear that there are many causes for excessive fat accumulation like genetic issues, too little exercise/physical activity, too much food, inappropriate food selection, eating while watching television, etc. In many cases, obesity is the result of a specific lifestyle which can typically be reversed (at least in the short term) by adopting a different lifestyle.

Obesity increases the risk of developing a number of serious health conditions, including:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gallstones
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Infertility or irregular periods

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says people should aim to make long-term changes, such as eating healthy on a regular basis, and boosting daily physical activity. Even small amounts of weight loss — such as 5% to 10% of your total body weight – can have health benefits.

For some, obesity as a disease invalidates the importance of discipline, proper nutrition, and exercise and enables individuals with obesity to escape responsibility. For others, obesity as a disease is a bridge to additional research, coordination of effective treatment, and increased resources for weight loss.

Ultimately, obesity is a complex entity that can have many causes; some are endocrine (like thyroid malfunction or hyperfunctioning of the adrenal gland or Cushing’s syndrome), but often the condition is from a combination of inactivity and overeating. For others, there are genetic factors that produce a tendency to be overweight even with the consumption of what would be for most people an appropriate number of calories. Whether the causes are hormonal, genetic, or reside in the brain is often difficult to determine.

If you’re in the Las Vegas area and looking for treatment for obesity and the life-threatening conditions that often accompany it, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Our experts can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.