Life After Bariatric Surgery

For many who think weight-loss surgery may be the only way to be healthy and live longer, the fear of how life might be after the procedure keeps them from taking life-saving measures. Be informed so that you can make educated decisions about your health. These facts can help you on the way to knowing what’s best for you and give you a glimpse into what one can usually expect after surgery.

Your recovery will depend on which procedure you choose (gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, lap-band, and duodenal switch surgery). For example:

  • Average Hospital Stay: Ranges from outpatient (return home same-day) to 2-3 days
  • Average Time Until Back to Work: Ranges from 3 days to 2 weeks
  • Average Time to Full Recovery: Ranges from 3 days to 6 weeks
  • Pain: Ranges from mild discomfort to manageable with pain medication
  • Diet: Ranges from a few limited foods to a strict and slow transition from clear liquids to solid foods
  • Back-to-Normal Activity: Ranges from 3 days to 4-6 weeks

Life after weight loss surgery includes (depending on your chosen procedure):

  • Full recovery in 1 to 6 weeks
  • Excess weight loss between 25% and 90+%
  • Many obesity-related health problems cured or improved
  • Significant diet and exercise changes
  • Good and bad changes in how friends, family, and strangers treat you
  • Challenges such as sagging skin, digestion issues, and weight regain

Improvements to your physical health can be as impressive as your rapid weight loss family-eating-at-the-table-619142_1920after bariatric surgery. Conditions such as Type 2 Diabetes, high blood pressure, GERD, and other issues related to metabolic syndrome have been shown to get better or completely go away following gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, lap-band, and duodenal switch surgery.

It is important to emphasize making healthy food and lifestyle choices even before weight-loss surgical procedures. Bariatric surgery is a tool. Use it to make changes for a long, healthy, productive, and happy life.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment at VIPSurg. Our team can help find the perfect treatment for you!

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Bariatric Surgery and Adolescents: Weighing the Risks Against the Benefits

The number of adolescents who are overweight or obese has leveled off in recent years, but unfortunately, the number who are severely obese — heavy enough to qualify for bariatric surgery — nearly doubled from 1999 to 2014. As a result, more doctors and parents are facing an extremely difficult dilemma: Should morbidly obese teenagers have bariatric surgery?

While surgery is the only thing that seems to work for these kids, the idea of weight-loss surgery for teens fills many parents and doctors with trepidation because we must weigh the benefits against the potential problems. Which is worse, risks from surgery or the likelihood of serious health risks from remaining obese?

An estimated three to four million adolescents are heavy enough to meet the criteria for bariatric surgery, but only about 1,000 teenagers per year undergo the surgery. Some medical centers will not perform it on teenagers, and many pediatricians never mention it to their heavy patients.

Obesity carries serious health risks in teenagers — including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, acid reflux, fatty liver and high cholesterol levels — that tend to be eased by surgery. Other health problems associated with obesity in teens include asthma, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and skin fungal infections.

Added to that are social and mental health problems, including isolation and depression. Obesity in teens is associated with significant mental and physical challenges.

According to the Surgeon General, overweight adolescents have a 70% chance of becoming overweight or obese adults. The likelihood increases to 80% if one or both parents are overweight or obese.

In the past, teenagers had two options:

  1. Lose weight by changing diet and exercise habits
  2. Live with current and future consequences of obesity

While the first option is ideal, unfortunately it is not effective for as many as 70% of teens who try it. However, as advances in weight loss surgery for adults have reduced complication and mortality rates, more teens – and their doctors – have begun exploring surgery as a valid option.

If you’d like to learn more about bariatric surgery options and if it might be right for you, contact us for a consultation. Visit https://bit.ly/2GePjXn for contact options and information.

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Benefits of Robotic Surgery

Technology is changing the way we do practically everything now, and the medical world isn’t immune. The da Vinci robot is changing the way surgeons are performing operations and is providing benefits to both patients and doctors.

While the surgeon sits at a modified computer console, he/she can control the instruments and camera. Placing their fingers into the master controls, the surgeon operates the arms of the da Vinci robot while simultaneously looking through a stereoscopic high-definition monitor that gives a better, more detailed 3-D view of the operating site than the human eye can provide. Every movement he makes with the master controls is replicated precisely by the robot. The robot’s “hands” have a high degree of dexterity, allowing surgeons the ability to operate in very tight spaces in the body that would otherwise only be accessible through open (long incision) surgery.

Using the da Vinci robot allows surgeons to perform a growing number of surgical procedures. Since these surgeries can be done through very small incisions, patients experience many benefits compared to open surgery, including:

  • Less trauma on the body
  • Shorter hospitalization
  • Reduced pain and discomfort
  • Faster recovery time and return to normal activities
  • Smaller incisions, resulting in reduced risk of infection
  • Reduced blood loss and transfusions
  • Minimal scarring

The surgical team supervises the robot at the patient’s bedside. Unlike traditional surgery where the surgeon stands over the patient sometimes for hours, a surgeon using the da Vinci system is seated, substantially decreasing surgeon fatigue. Add in the greater visualization abilities, enhanced dexterity, and greater precision and there are major advantages for both patients and surgeons using robotic surgery alike.

Dr. Tsuda and Dr. Ryan at VIPSurg are expert robotic surgeons. Call 702-487-6000 to schedule a consultation.

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Bariatric Surgery: Busting the Myths and Misconceptions

Weight-loss surgery is a potentially life-saving procedure that helps you lose a substantial amount of weight by shrinking the size of your stomach and reducing food intake. Gastric bypass, lap band, and gastric sleeve are the three most recognizable names in bariatric surgery, but there are also a variety of other options thanks to continued medical advancements. Still, there remains a significant portion of the morbidly obese population who are unwilling to consider treatment for a variety of reasons; unfortunately, their reasons are often based on misconceptions or myths related to bariatric procedures.

Let’s bust 3 common weight-loss surgery myths:

Myth: Most bariatric surgery patients regain most if not all of their lost weight.Truth Vs Myth Bowling Facts Investigating Busting Untruth

Truth: Although some weight-loss surgery patients regain weight after their procedure, it’s not the norm. According to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, up to 50% of patients may regain a small amount of weight in the years after surgery, but it usually only amounts to 5% of weight lost. Most patients embrace the life-changing effects of weight-loss surgery by improving their diets and habits.

Myth: The risks of weight-loss surgery outweigh the risks of obesity.

Truth: Weight-loss surgery is a quite safe procedure. Studies show that bariatric surgery patients reduce their mortality rates by up to 89% compared with severely obese people who avoid treatment.

Obesity is a disease linked with a number of serious health conditions including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer. The National Institutes of Health lists obesity as the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States.

Myth: Weight-loss surgery is nothing more than a cop out for people who are too lazy to diet and exercise.

Truth: Those affected by severe obesity are resistant to long-term weight loss by diet and exercise. The National Institutes of Health Experts Panel recognizes that sustained weight loss is nearly impossible for those affected by severe obesity and may only be achievable through bariatric surgery. Diet, exercise, and lifestyle changes are part of treatment, but in order to shed the necessary amount of weight to make a life-changing, healthful impact, bariatric surgery may be the best option.

If you are struggling with severe obesity and are considering surgery, schedule a consultation at VIPSurg. Our team of experts will look at your personal situation and help find the right treatment for you.

 

 

 

5 Common Signs and Symptoms of a Hernia

Hernias are caused when fatty tissue or internal organs squeeze through weak muscle walls and connective tissue. A hernia can occur in any part of the body, but the most common areas are the inner groin (inguinal hernia), outer groin (femoral hernia), near the navel (umbilical hernia), upper abdomen (hiatal hernia), or at the site of a recent surgical scar (incisional hernia) They can be mildly to extremely painful, and they sometimes go away when you press on them or lie down. They are aggravated by coughing or sneezing. If a hernia doesn’t resolve itself, you may require surgery.

Here are 5 common signs and symptoms of a hernia:

  1. Visible Lump – often the first indication of a hernia is a visible lump or bulge which left untreated becomes very painful as more tissue is forced through the opening, widening and splitting the muscle, forming a large sac. Sometimes patients notice the bulge before the pain, but often there’s pain before the lump is noticeable to the naked eye.

**It’s very important that you go to your doctor as soon as you notice a lump anywhere as it may signify another health issue.

  1. Pain — ranging from slightly uncomfortable to severely painful, patients report everything from just seeing the bulge with no pain to excruciating pain that cannot be ignored
  2. A Full Feeling — A heavy, bloated, or uncomfortable feeling in your gut is common to those with umbilical or hiatal hernias. A feeling often described as a dragging sensation in the groin may be an inguinal hernia.
  3. Stomach Upset — including indigestion, nausea, and bowel issues may occur with hernias located in the groin or abdominal areas. If a hernia becomes strangulated (or blood supply is cut off), you will experience nausea and vomiting. A strangulated hernia requires immediate emergency medical attention as it is life-threatening to the patient.
  4. Difficulty with Daily Activities — as hernias grow and pain worsens, the quality of your daily life is affected. When common activities such as work, picking up children, and exercise become difficult and uncomfortable, hernia-repair surgery is often the answer.

At VIPSurg, our surgeons are experts in hernia repair using minimally invasive daVinci robotic surgery. Schedule a consultation to learn more.

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Tips for Finding the Right Surgeon for You

Almost any surgery can cause serious complications, so you always want to be in good surgical hands. With so many doctors, how do you know which is the right surgeon for you?

One indicator to note is how often surgeons perform a procedure. That can be vital for operations that are relatively new, such as gastric bypass surgery for treating obesity. While many surgeons have started performing the operation, not all are qualified. A September 2009 study found that the risk of serious complications from the most common form of gastric bypass surgery fell by 10 percent for every additional 10 cases per year the surgeon had performed.

However, quantity isn’t the only or even most important measure of quality. A May 2009 study of 81,289 adults who had heart bypass surgery, for example, found that success depended more on how well surgeons and hospitals adhered to various markers of surgical excellence—such as using the appropriate technique during the operation and prescribing the right medications before and afterward—than the number of procedures performed.

Don’t be afraid to question your doctor. Ask your prospective surgeon these questions before going under the knife:

  • Is surgery really necessary? The best way to avoid surgical errors is to avoid surgery entirely, so ask about the effectiveness and safety of alternatives. Compare those with the risks of surgery and the chance that it will help you.
  • Is your board certification up to date? Look for a surgeon who has undergone the necessary training, even after being in clinical practice, to maintain board certification in his or her specialty.
  • What’s your experience? Ask how many operations the surgeon has performed in the past year and how that compares with his or her peers. You don’t have to find the busiest, most experienced surgeon in North America, but it’s important to avoid the doctor who does very few of the procedures, especially in a place that does very few.
  • What are your success, failure, and complication rates? Not all will be able or willing to tell you, but the good ones should be.
  • What’s the hospital’s infection rate? Seventeen states now make that information public, and many hospitals report their rates voluntarily.

doctor-650534_960_720Just remember to worry less about bedside manner and more about the final outcome. If you have to choose between a nice surgeon and a highly skilled surgeon, the skilled surgeon is the better bet.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a surgeon who is both compassionate and highly skilled, Dr. Tsuda at VIP Surg is everything you’re searching for. Whether you have general surgery needs or are interested in bariatric surgery, he and his team of experts have the experience and skill for you to have an excellent outcome.

Gallbladder Disease and Gallstones

Some people think of their gallbladder as being “expendable”. Not that anybody wants any of their organs to be removed, but since many people live a seemingly normal life after getting their gallbladder removed, many people don’t think their gallbladder plays an important role in their overall health. After all, how important can your gallbladder be if you can do just fine after it’s surgically removed? The gallbladder actually plays a very important role in your body. It is an essential part of the digestive system.

Your gallbladder is most likely to give you trouble if something blocks the flow of bile through the bile ducts. That is usually a gallstone. Gallstones form when substances in bile harden. Rarely, you can also get cancer in your gallbladder. Many gallbladder problems get better with removal of the gallbladder. Fortunately, you can live without a gallbladder. Bile has other ways of reaching your small intestine.

In the United States, about a million new cases of gallstone disease are diagnosed each year, and some 800,000 operations are performed to treat gallstones, making it the most common gastrointestinal disorder requiring hospitalization.

Gallstone disease is the most common disorder affecting the body’s biliary system, the network of organs and ducts that create, transport, store, and release bile. Bile contains cholesterol, water, proteins, bilirubin (a breakdown product from blood cells), bile salts (the chemicals necessary to digest fat), and small amounts of copper or other materials. If the chemical balance of bile contains too much of any of these components, particularly of cholesterol, crystals form and can harden into stones.

In terms of size, gallstones can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. A person can form one large stone in his or her gallbladder, or hundreds! About 10 percent of the population has gallstones, but the vast majority experiences no symptoms and need no treatment. However, in 1 percent to 2 percent of these people, gallstones can cause problems by lodging in bile ducts, stopping the flow of bile or digestive enzymes, and leading to severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inflammation, and even life-threatening infection.

Gallstone attack has some classic symptoms: The most agonizing pain is experienced in the upper right part of the abdomen under the ribs. Usually it appears suddenly, sometimes an hour or two after eating a fatty meal. The pain may get worse quickly, and then last for several hours. Many times, the pain may radiate to the back between the shoulder blades or under the right shoulder. Inhaling deeply, or moving, often makes the pain worse. The primary therapy for gallstones that are causing pain, inflammation, or infection is removal of the gallbladder.

A number of factors put people at higher risk of gallstones:

  • Gender: Women between the ages of 20 and 60 are 3 times more likely to develop gallstones than are men in the same age group. By age 60, 20 percent of American women have gallstones.
  • Age: The incidence of gallstone disease increases with age.Tsuda 11-18
  • Genetics: Family history and ethnicity are critical risk factors in development of gallstones, though no gene responsible for gallstone formation has yet been discovered. African-Americans seem to have lower rates of gallstone disease than American Indians, whites, or Hispanics.
  • Obesity: Obesity is a significant risk factor, particularly for women. Obesity also slows down the emptying of the gallbladder.
  • Location of body fat: Belly fat, that spare tire around the middle, dramatically increases the chance of developing stones.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes often have high levels of triglycerides in their blood, and these fatty acids tend to increase the risk of gallstones.

Even if you’re not at risk for gallstones, it is wise to maintain a healthy body weight, by among other things, sticking to a diet that is low in fat and cholesterol and high in fiber.

If you are in the Las Vegas area and suffering with gallstones or gallbladder disease, schedule a consultation at VIP Surg.