Tips for Finding the Right Surgeon for You

Almost any surgery can cause serious complications, so you always want to be in good surgical hands. With so many doctors, how do you know which is the right surgeon for you?

One indicator to note is how often surgeons perform a procedure. That can be vital for operations that are relatively new, such as gastric bypass surgery for treating obesity. While many surgeons have started performing the operation, not all are qualified. A September 2009 study found that the risk of serious complications from the most common form of gastric bypass surgery fell by 10 percent for every additional 10 cases per year the surgeon had performed.

However, quantity isn’t the only or even most important measure of quality. A May 2009 study of 81,289 adults who had heart bypass surgery, for example, found that success depended more on how well surgeons and hospitals adhered to various markers of surgical excellence—such as using the appropriate technique during the operation and prescribing the right medications before and afterward—than the number of procedures performed.

Don’t be afraid to question your doctor. Ask your prospective surgeon these questions before going under the knife:

  • Is surgery really necessary? The best way to avoid surgical errors is to avoid surgery entirely, so ask about the effectiveness and safety of alternatives. Compare those with the risks of surgery and the chance that it will help you.
  • Is your board certification up to date? Look for a surgeon who has undergone the necessary training, even after being in clinical practice, to maintain board certification in his or her specialty.
  • What’s your experience? Ask how many operations the surgeon has performed in the past year and how that compares with his or her peers. You don’t have to find the busiest, most experienced surgeon in North America, but it’s important to avoid the doctor who does very few of the procedures, especially in a place that does very few.
  • What are your success, failure, and complication rates? Not all will be able or willing to tell you, but the good ones should be.
  • What’s the hospital’s infection rate? Seventeen states now make that information public, and many hospitals report their rates voluntarily.

doctor-650534_960_720Just remember to worry less about bedside manner and more about the final outcome. If you have to choose between a nice surgeon and a highly skilled surgeon, the skilled surgeon is the better bet.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a surgeon who is both compassionate and highly skilled, Dr. Tsuda at VIP Surg is everything you’re searching for. Whether you have general surgery needs or are interested in bariatric surgery, he and his team of experts have the experience and skill for you to have an excellent outcome.

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Weight Loss after Gallbladder Surgery

If you have a tendency to develop painful gallstones, the remedy is usually removal of the gallbladder. This procedure is called a cholecystectomy. The gallbladder is the part of your digestive system that stores bile, which is produced in the liver. Bile helps with the digestion of fatty foods. Removing the gallbladder doesn’t stop the liver from making the bile necessary to digest fats. Instead of being stored in the gallbladder, the bile will continuously drip into your digestive system. Your digestive system will continue to function without a gallbladder. The surgery may affect your weight in the short term, but certain lifestyle changes may help you lose or maintain weight in the long term.3D illustration of male Gallbladder.

Fast facts on weight loss after gallbladder removal:

  • A person can live without their gallbladder.
  • When gallstones become a problem, surgery is usually required to remove the gallbladder.
  • It is not uncommon for people to lose a little weight after having a cholecystectomy.
  • There are several strategies, including exercise and diet that can be used to make this short-term weight loss a more permanent change.

There seems to be some connection between diet and gallstones. For example, obesity and rapid weight loss are risk factors for developing gallstones. There’s also an increased risk for gallstones if you have a diet high in refined carbohydrates and calories, but low in fiber.

After having your gallbladder removed, it’s quite possible that you’ll experience some weight loss. This may be because of:

  • Eliminating fatty foods: After surgery, you may have some trouble digesting fatty foods until your body adjusts. For that reason, your surgeon may instruct you to avoid high-fat and fried foods until your body is better able to handle them.
  • Eating a bland diet: During recovery, you may also find that spicy foods and foods that cause gas can lead to gastrointestinal upset. This can make you shy away from some of your favorite dishes.
  • Selecting smaller portions: For a few weeks after surgery, you may not be able to eat large amounts of food at one sitting. You’ll probably be advised to eat more frequent, but smaller meals.

During this time, you might be taking in fewer calories than you were before the surgery. If so, you’re likely to lose weight, at least temporarily. If you want to continue the trend, remember that short-term and quick weight-loss plans are not healthy and may make matters worse in the long run. Instead, strive to make weight loss part of an overall healthier way of living. That means making good dietary choices and engaging in regular exercise. It doesn’t mean starving or completely depriving yourself of the foods you love.

Living an active lifestyle is essential for weight loss after gallbladder removal. However, it is important to speak with your doctor about when it is appropriate to return to or begin an exercise routine after surgery. Someone with a significant amount of weight to lose should speak with their doctor for advice and support.

Despite having your gallbladder removed, it’s still possible to lose weight. If you have a lot of weight to lose, schedule a consultation with VIP SURG to learn how you can do it safely.
 

The Laparoscopic Technique

The Laparoscopic Technique | Dr. Shawn TsudaMany surgeries are being done these days without having to use the traditional large incision that leaves large scars and long recovery times. Laparoscopic surgery is the umbrella term that is used for this type of surgery. Laparoscopic techniques have revolutionized the field of surgery with benefits that include decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to normal activities following surgery, fewer postoperative complications, and the added bonus of being virtually scarless. Laparoscopic surgery, sometimes called keyhole surgery or minimally invasive surgery (MIS), is a widely accepted surgical technique that uses small incisions and long pencil-like instruments to perform operations with a camera.

Today, almost all abdominal surgeries are performed laparoscopically including:

  • hernia repairs
  • gastric bypass
  • bowel resection
  • organ removal

Laparoscopic surgery has successfully replaced open surgery as the preferred treatment option for issues such as bariatric surgery and gallbladder removal. The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is now also carried out using laparoscopic techniques too.

Laparoscopic surgery is also known as MIS because the surgeon is able to use a laparoscope with a small camera on it to go directly where the surgery is needed. This allows surgeons to find out where or even if a larger incision is needed to perform an operation.

Laparoscopic surgery involves several small incisions, which is why it is sometimes called keyhole surgery. The Laparoscope goes into one small incision and special surgical instruments go into the others. The scope is attached to a video monitor, so the surgeon can see what is going on inside the body part that is being examined.

Because of the less invasive nature of the surgery, laparoscopic surgery recovery time is shorter than that of traditional surgery. Most laparoscopic surgery can be done on an outpatient basis, although depending on the specific surgery, an occasional hospital stay is necessary.

As with any surgery, it is normal to feel tired for a few weeks after a procedure. Your specific recovery time will depend on your physical condition when you went in for the surgery.

If you are considering surgery, contact Dr. Tsuda to see if a laparoscopic procedure is right for you.

Read more online at: http://www.surgery.usc.edu/divisions/tumor/pancreasdiseases/web%20pages/laparoscopic%20surgery/WHAT%20IS%20LAP%20SURGERY.html