Tips for Enjoying a Healthy Thanksgiving

Let’s be candid, shall we? During any holiday—especially Thanksgiving—people have a lot of food put in front of them. Many times, it is way too much food for even the best of metabolisms to handle without putting on a few pounds. Wouldn’t it be amazing if you could still enjoy the holidays and yet never gain an ounce?

During Thanksgiving, it’s easy to go overboard with the calories and consumption. Temptations of gooey pecan pie and dense sweet potatoes topped with crackly marshmallows make it seem impossible to be disciplined.

However, eating healthfully on Thanksgiving doesn’t mean you have to forgo all your favorite foods. If you’ve got your eating under control for the majority of the time, go ahead and have a piece of pie — just don’t lose control entirely.

Keep your willpower and your wits about you by using these tips:

  1. Stick to healthy portions.

Just one plate of Thanksgiving food is all you get. Fill up half your plate with vegetables,fruit, and a whole wheat roll, a quarter of it with mashed potatoes or sweet potatoes, and a quarter of it with turkey or ham. The more colorful your plate, the better – so get lots of leafy greens, carrots, bell peppers, and beets in your veggie selection. If you fill up on those lower caloric density and higher nutrition things, you’re going to feel full, but not bloated and tired, because it’s a lighter far.

It’s a holiday, so indulge a bit if your diet allows it. If you’re going to eat dessert, make sure you allot for the calories elsewhere – don’t go back for that second helping of marshmallow sweet potatoes, and instead opt for the cranberry salad.

  1. Eat before you indulge.

Don’t starve yourself during the early part of Thanksgiving Day, with the idea that you’re just “saving room” for all the food, or that this will make it okay for you to overeat later.

If you’re going to a Thanksgiving lunch, be sure you eat breakfast before. If you’re going to a dinner, be sure you eat lunch or have a snack in the afternoon. You should have your normal meals because whenever we get over-hungry, we tend to overeat.

  1. Substitute healthy ingredients for unhealthy ones.

There are plenty of ways to make Thanksgiving fare healthier. For mashed potatoes, consider mixing in chicken broth, herbs, or roasted garlic to perk up the flavor instead of adding in butter. For green bean casserole, swap out fried onions with toasted almonds for a less-oily alternative, and instead of having cranberry sauce, opt instead to make a cranberry salad. For dips, use Greek yogurt instead of sour cream — the consistency is similar, but yogurt has less fat and more protein.

  1. Drink lots of water and take a walk after eating.

Many times, when people think they are hungry, they are really just thirsty. By drinking lots of water throughout the day, you’ll lower the risk of overeating. Keep in mind that alcohol not only has lots of calories, but it’s effects can also lower your willpower for keeping to your healthy lifestyle.

It’s also a good idea to take a walk after eating to get your metabolism going instead of laying on the couch. Ultimately, you’ll sleep much better that night if you do a little exercise after eating rather that falling into a food coma.

All of us at VIP Surg wish you and yours a happy, healthy, and safe Thanksgiving! We are here to help with your bariatric and general surgery needs.

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Rates of Obesity are on the Rise

The global obesity rate has nearly doubled since 1980, and there are now over 200Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 11.51.03 AM million obese men and nearly 300 million obese women, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. In the United States, more than one third of adults (or 78.6 million people) are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Obesity is usually defined by using a ratio of height to weight called body mass index (BMI), which usually correlates with a person’s level of body fat. According to the CDC, an adult with a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

At a fundamental level, obesity occurs when people regularly eat more calories than they burn, but actually a number of factors can contribute to obesity, including:

  • lack of physical activity
  • lack of sleep
  • genetics and certain medications that slow calorie burn, increase appetite, or cause water retention, such as corticosteroids, antidepressants, or some seizure medications

Modern culture, conveniences, and other environmental factors also, in part, contribute to obesity. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, environmental factors that promote obesity include:

  • oversized food portions
  • busy work schedules that don’t allow for physical activity
  • lack of access to healthy foods at supermarkets
  • lack of safe places for physical activity

Because friends share similar environments and carry out activities together that may contribute to weight gain, obesity has also been found to “spread” socially among friends according to a 2011 study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Certain health conditions also can lead to weight gain, including:

  • Hypothyroidism — an underactive thyroid gland that slows metabolism and causes fatigue and weakness
  • PCOS, or polycystic ovarian syndrome — which affects up to 10 percent of women of childbearing age and can also lead to excess body hair and reproductive problems
  • Cushing’s syndrome — which stems from an overproduction of the hormone cortisol by the adrenal glands and is characterized by weight gain in the upper body, face and neck
  • Prader-Willi syndrome– a rare condition in which people never feel full, and so they want to eat constantly, according to the Mayo Clinic

Although there are lots of fad diets, such short-term dietary changes are not the best way to maintain a healthy weight, the CDC says. Instead, people should aim to make long-term changes, such as eating healthy on a regular basis, and boosting daily physical activity. Even small amounts of weight loss — such as 5 to 10 percent of your total body weight – can have health benefits, the CDC says.

For people who are still severely obese after attempting to lose weight through diet and exercise, other treatments, such as bariatric surgery, may be an option. Bariatric surgery is recommended for people with a BMI of 40 or more, or if they have a serious health problem related to their obesity and have a BMI of 35 or more. In many cases, people with a BMI of 30 or more are eligible for one type of bariatric surgery if they also have at least one health problem linked with obesity.

If you’re struggling with obesity and live in the Las Vegas area, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Our experts can help find the right treatment for you.

 

Exercise: How Much is Enough?

Our bodies were meant to move — they actually crave exercise. As a matter of fact, regular exercise is necessary for physical fitness and good health. It reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes and other diseases, and it can improve your appearance and delay the aging process. So why aren’t we all doing it?

Many say lack of time is their single biggest obstacle to fitness, but experts say you may be overestimating how much exercise you really need to get at one time. Many think exercise means you have to hit the point where you’re completely out of breath and panting after you’ve finished, and you can do that, but for the majority of health benefits, it’s not necessary.

People often assume that more is better. On the contrary; doing too much too soon or performing intense exercises on a daily basis can have harmful effects, such as muscle/tendon strains, loss of lean tissue, and fitness-level plateaus. However, if you don’t exercise at all, your muscles will become flabby and weak, your heart and lungs won’t function efficiently, and your joints will be stiff and easily injured.

If you are overweight or obese, your fitness goals probably go beyond lowering your risk for disease, but even if losing weight is your primary goal, it’s nice to know what research actually shows when it comes to how much exercise you should be doing each week for better health.

Here are a few statistics to consider:

  • 30 minutes of interval training per week (broken into 3 workouts) reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week reduces the risk of cancer.
  • 120 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week offers improvements in memory.

People seem to have heard the message that you need 30 minutes of exercise, five days a Exercise tracking device Dollarphotoclub_101019544 (2)week according to federal guidelines. If you get that, you’ll get 85% of the health benefits we talk about. However, the misconception is that it’s all or nothing. It’s also important to note that federal guidelines call for moderate-intensity exercise, which means you don’t have to be killing yourself with long runs, boot camp, or spin class five days a week in order to relish the rewards. Being consistent with exercise is probably the most important factor in achieving desired results.

If you’re obese and looking for ways to get fit and lower your risk of disease, schedule an appointment at VIP SURG. We can help you find the right treatment.

High Blood Pressure: Do these Things Now to Prevent Future Problems

Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of arteries, and it’s normal for it to rise and fall throughout the day. However, when blood pressure stays elevated over time, it’s called hypertension (aka high blood pressure). High blood pressure is dangerous because it makes the heart work too hard and contributes to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). It increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, which are the first- and third-leading causes of death among Americans. High blood pressure also can result in other conditions, such as congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness. About two-thirds of people over age 65 have high blood pressure. This means that even if you don’t have high blood pressure now, you are likely to develop it in the future unless you adopt a healthy lifestyle.

  • Maintain a healthy weight – Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing high blood pressure. In fact, your blood pressure rises as your body weight increases. Losing even 10 pounds can lower your blood pressure, and losing weight has the biggest effect on those who are overweight and already have hypertension.
  • Be physically active – Being physically active is one of the most important things you can do to prevent or control high blood pressure. Try to engage in physical activity for a total of 30 minutes on most days of the week. You can do this by combining everyday chores with moderate-level sporting activities, such as walking.
  • Follow a healthy eating plan – What you eat affects your chances of getting hightape-403593__340 blood pressure. A healthy eating plan can both reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and lower a blood pressure that is already too high. An important part of healthy eating is choosing foods that are low in salt (sodium chloride) and other forms of sodium. Using less sodium is key to keeping blood pressure at a healthy level. Use spices, garlic, and onions to add flavor to your meals without adding more sodium. Set up a healthy eating plan with foods low in saturated fat,total fat, and cholesterol, and high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods.
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation – In addition to raising blood pressure, too much alcohol can add unneeded calories to your diet. If you drink alcoholic beverages, have only a moderate amount—one drink a day for women, two drinks a day for men.
  • Take prescribed medications as directed – If you need drugs to help lower your
    lood pressure, you still should follow the lifestyle changes mentioned above. Use notes and other reminders to help you remember to take your meds. Ask your family to help you with reminder phone calls and messages.

These are just a few of the relatively easy things you can do to help lower or prevent hypertension. Ultimately, keeping blood pressure at healthy levels can be quite difficult – especially if you are dealing with other severe health problems such as obesity and the issues that often accompany it. If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering weight-loss surgery, schedule a consultation with VIP SURG. We can help find the right treatment for you.

The True Size of the American Obesity Epidemic

To understand the true magnitude of the American obesity epidemic, we first need to understand what it really means to be overweight. Doctors and nutritionists classify people as either underweight, healthy weight, overweight, or obese. These different classifications are determined by body mass index (BMI), or a measure of body fat based on your height and weight.

To get a basic idea, this chart from the CDC approximates what that means for someone who is 5’9” tall.

Height Weight Range BMI Considered
Source: CDC      
5′ 9″ 124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
  125 lbs to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Healthy weight
  169 lbs to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
  203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

As for what is driving America’s chronic weight problem, there are no definite answers. Scientific studies often reach conflicting conclusions. Many theories are out there, but the preponderance of evidence points to the two causes most people already suspect: too much food and too little exercise.

Bigger portions, confusing “diet” for “nutrition,” and lack of exercise are a deadly combination. Today, each American puts away an average of 195lbs of meat every year, compared to just 138lbs in the 1950’s. Consumption of added fats also shot up by around two thirds over the same period, and grain consumption rose 45% since 1970.

Research published by the World Health Organization found that a rise in fast food sales correlated to a rise in body mass index, and Americans are notorious for their fast-food consumption. It is not just how much we eat, but what we eat.

The role of diet in the obesity epidemic is obviously major, but it’s also complex. Consumers are sent mixed messages when it comes to what to eat and how much. Larger portions, processed packaged food, and drive-thru meals are branded as almost classically American — fast, cheap, filling, and delicious, but yet we spend billions of dollars annually on weight loss schemes.

Lack of exercise is also a major culprit in the obesity epidemic. A far greater majority of us are sitting throughout our workday. According to one study, only 20% of today’s jobs require at least moderate physical activity, as opposed to 50% of jobs in 1960. Other research suggests Americans burn 120 to 140 fewer calories a day than they did 50 years ago. Add this to the higher number of calories we are packing in, and we get a perfect recipe for weight gain.

A number of other factors are thought to play a role in the obesity epidemic, such as the in- utero effects of smoking and excessive weight gain in pregnant mothers. Poor sleep, stress, and lower rates of breastfeeding are also thought to contribute to a child’s long-term obesity risk. Of course, these factors are not explicit or solitary causes of obesity, but they are reliable indicators of the kinds of systemic problems contributing to this crisis.

In the end, though, we can’t lose sight of the big picture. Over the past years, diet fads have come and gone, with people rushing to blame red meat, dairy, wheat, fat, sugar, etc. for making them fat, but in reality, the problem is much simpler. Genetics and age do strongly influence metabolism, but as the CDC points out, weight gain and loss is primarily a formula of total calories consumed versus total calories used.

If you are looking for answers to debilitating obesity and the health issues that often accompany the extra weight, contact VIP Surg at (702) 487-6006. We can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

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Does your Diet Support your Warm-Weather Exercise Regimen?

Spring is here, and you might be changing up your fitness routine with warm weather in mind. However, just taking your exercise outside and hydrating more might not cut it for your new regimen. You need to properly fuel your body for the exercise you are doing.

Whether you’re training for fat-loss, a race personal best or just fun, how you fuel your body around the clock – not just immediately before or after exercise – affects your workouts. Try to avoid starving and then feasting; just stay fed by regularly eating while you’re awake. By eating regularly throughout the day, you can largely eliminate the need to worry about dedicated pre- and post-workout meals. Just schedule your workout between your regular meals.

Americans are notorious for getting the bulk of their protein intake at dinner. However, 2014 research published in the Journal of Nutrition shows that simply distributing your regular protein intake more evenly throughout the day improves the body’s ability to build lean muscle. Whatever your sport or workout goal, having healthy levels of muscle will help you reach it. Eat at least 25 to 30 grams of protein per meal. And, remember, those meals should be frequent.

It is important to boost your hydration factor. Most of us are chronically dehydrated, which can take a toll on your ability to focus and concentrate when exercising, and it can impair your strength and power. Research in the Journal of Athletic Training also shows that dehydration can worsen post-exercise muscle soreness. During exercise, aim to drink 6 to 8 ounces of water every 15 to 30 minutes. Ideally, when you finish your workout, your weight should be no more than 2 percent less than your starting weight. Any additional losses in weight point to significant dehydration.

Cutting down on packaged foods and focusing on nature-made foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy and meats is also important. Put junk in, and you can expect to get junk out.

Whatever your exercise goals or routines, know that you can’t out-exercise a bad diet. After all, food is fuel. Without the right fuel in the tank, you’re not going to get where you want to go.

If you’re in the Las Vegas area and are interested in weight-loss surgery, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He can help you find the perfect treatment for your situation.Screen Shot 2017-04-10 at 11.19.07 AM

Reboot your Exercise Routine for Spring

With warmer temperatures and sunny days, spring is the ideal time to reboot your exercise schedule. Your favorite running trails are calling, and suddenly, those morning fitness classes don’t seem too early. Most of you have been working hard in the gym since you committed to your New Year’s goals, and the weekly treadmill and indoor aerobic classes may have lost their appeal. If you’re ready for some fun and fresh exercise changes to keep you motivated, try just a few changes to your weekly routine, and you’ll be reinvigorated to stick to your fitness goals and jump into the spring season.

  • Get outside
    • Get off the treadmill once or twice a week and take your cardio outdoors.
    • exercising outdoors may improve energy levels and decrease stress to a greater extent than working out inside.

If taking your workout out of the gym doesn’t work for you, there are still plenty of ways to get out of an exercise rut:

  • If you do spinning, try yoga.
    • Cycling is predominantly a cardiovascular activity that is focused on the lower body and core. Yoga poses will strengthen your upper body, reverse the postural imbalance of the forward flexion associated with cycling and open up your hips for a more mobile body (and will make your cycling classes more productive!).
  • If you do yoga, try resistance training.Spring flatlay composition with sport equipment and tulips.
    • Throw in some dumbbells, resistance bands, kettlebells, or Body Bars — anything to add in external resistance to a workout. Yoga is definitely a strength builder, but rock your workout by trying integrated and compound resistance training to build lean muscle.
  • If you do Pilates, try high intensity interval training (aka HIIT).
    • A major portion of Pilates programming is either performed on a mat or specialized equipment and often lacks a metabolic component. Adding some high intensity interval training will boost metabolism, increase aerobic capacity, and aid in weight management.

The possibilities are endless. Inside or outside? Yoga or cycling? In the end, you don’t have to choose just one. Some workout groups exist entirely outdoors, and spring is a great time to try one of those. The truth is that mixing up indoor and outdoor sessions and different types of activities is a great way to keep exercise exciting and fun.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a weight-loss surgeon, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for a consultation. He and his expert team will help find the right treatment for you.