Obesity’s Link to Breast Cancer

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and as with many conditions and diseases, obesity can increase one’s risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 70% of American adults are overweight. Compared with people of normal weight, those who are overweight or obese are at greater risk for many diseases, including diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and many cancers. Most breast cancers occur after menopause. For women, being overweight or obese after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer. 

Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women who are overweight tend to have higher levels of insulin, another hormone. Higher insulin levels have also been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer.

Before menopause, most estrogens in the body are produced in the ovaries. After menopause, the ovaries no longer produce much estrogen and estrogens mainly come from fat tissue. Fat tissue contains an enzyme called aromatase that converts hormones called androgens (made mostly in the adrenal glands) to estrogens. Therefore, heavier women have higher blood estrogen levels than leaner women.

Body shape may also affect breast cancer risk. Some findings show women who put on extra weight around their middle sections (sometimes called “apple-shaped”), as opposed to their hips and thighs (sometimes called “pear-shaped”), have a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer.

And even though gaining weight can raise your cancer risk, it’s not clear whether losing weight reduces your risk. This has been difficult to study, mainly because very few people actually lose weight during adulthood, and those who do lose weight don’t usually keep it off over a long period of time. 

We do know that avoiding weight gain is helpful, whether you are overweight now or not. One large study found women who gained about 20 pounds after age 18 had a 15 percent higher risk of breast cancer compared to women who gained little or no weight. If you’re carrying extra pounds, losing as little as 5%-10% of your weight improves your overall health. 

Exercise can also lower breast cancer risk in addition to helping lose weight. Many studies have found that exercise is a breast-healthy habit. As little as 75 to 150 minutes of brisk walking each week has been shown to lower risk. Exercising more may lower your breast cancer risk even further.

Strong evidence for a relationship between weight loss and cancer risk comes from studies of people who have undergone bariatric surgery. Obese people who have bariatric surgery appear to have lower risks of obesity-related cancers than obese people who do not have bariatric surgery.

If you’re considering bariatric surgery, schedule a consultation here at VIPSurg. Our team of experts can help find the right treatment for you.

close up of hands and pink cancer awareness ribbon

Obesity is a Big Deal! A Look at the Complexity of this Serious Health Problem

Let’s face it, often those of us who are overweight or obese are judged quite harshly by society. People generally assume that obesity is strictly a matter of personal willpower, the product of bad choices about physical activity and diet. It is assumed that an overweight or obese person has little self-control. This kind of bias and thinking gets in the way of dealing with obesity as the serious health issue it is.

Obesity is a very complicated condition. About 50 to 70% of one’s risk of obesity is genetically determined. You can make choices that make it better or worse, but that’s just like any other chronic disease. When the blame and shame that are so common get in the way, it makes it hard to improve the health of people living with obesity.

A lot of health plans have had broad, blanket exclusions for obesity, thinking that it is a cosmetic condition. However, the rise in the prevalence of obesity that’s happened over the last 3 decades has made it clear that it’s creating a trend of chronic disease ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes to many cancers.

Because weight-based stereotypes and prejudices so often emerge from claims that obesity is caused and maintained by personal characteristics such as laziness or lack of willpower, there is a clear need for increased public awareness and education about the complex biology of obesity and the significant obstacles that exist in efforts to achieve sustainable weight loss. The prevailing societal and media messages that reinforce blame on obese persons need to be replaced with messages that obesity is a chronic disease with a complex set of causes. It is a lifelong condition for most obese persons.

Several studies have consistently demonstrated that experiencing weight stigma increases the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy eating behaviors and lower levels of physical activity, both of which exacerbate obesity and weight gain. Among youths, several studies have demonstrated that overweight children who experience weight-based teasing are more likely to engage in binge-eating and unhealthy weight control behaviors compared with overweight peers who are not teased, even after controlling for variables such as BMI and socioeconomic status. Other research has consistently documented a positive association between weight-based victimization and eating disorder symptoms and bulimia. Weight-based victimization among overweight youths has been linked to lower levels of physical activity, negative attitudes about sports, and lower participation in physical activity among overweight students.

If you’re looking for treatment for this very real, physical disease, contact VIPSurg for an appointment. Our expert team understands the complexity of obesity and all the issues that come with it. They can help find the right treatment for you.

Obese woman thinking

Aging and Obesity: Is Bariatric Surgery an Option for the Elderly Patient?

The good news is that improved life expectancy is allowing baby boomers to enter their golden years in unprecedented numbers. The bad news is that rates of obesity among this aging demographic are climbing in never-before-seen numbers as well, putting this population at risk of developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes, lower extremity arthritis, sleep apnea, and stroke, all of which can lead to disability. Treatment guidelines to lose weight in the elderly have been difficult to define, yet it is very clear that obesity in the elderly contributes to worsening of multiple parameters which along with the metabolic problems mentioned already, include cognition, functionality and quality of life. While ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of weight-loss aka bariatric surgery in the general adult population, more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older.

Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; this is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population.

The risk of any surgical intervention increases as one gets older. However, weight-loss surgery is very safe, and the potential benefits routinely outweigh any of the associated risks if there are no other health issues that would dramatically increase the risk of surgery.

Ideally, a comprehensive assessment would focus on psychosocial and functional status in addition to physical data. An excellent support system of family, friends, or caregiver resources is imperative. The selected patient should be capable of engaging in physical interventions focusing on mitigating muscle loss and osteoporosis and of maintaining changes in eating behavior as needed as well. A recommended “pre-habilitation” program may include a physical therapist to assist with strength and endurance training and a nutritionist to aide in enhancing protein intake, vitamin D, and other nutrient sufficiency.

Identifying goals of care, quality of life, and improved function should be considered as primary objectives of undergoing surgery. Goals of the surgery include not only weight loss but also improvements in physiological function, comorbidity, and quality of life, and reduction in institutionalization.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, VIPSurg is here to help. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Old obese woman walking with stick

 

 

 

Exercise: How Much is Enough?

Our bodies were meant to move — they actually crave exercise. As a matter of fact, regular exercise is necessary for physical fitness and good health. It reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes and other diseases, and it can improve your appearance and delay the aging process. So why aren’t we all doing it?

Many say lack of time is their single biggest obstacle to fitness, but experts say you may be overestimating how much exercise you really need to get at one time. Many think exercise means you have to hit the point where you’re completely out of breath and panting after you’ve finished, and you can do that, but for the majority of health benefits, it’s not necessary.

People often assume that more is better. On the contrary; doing too much too soon or performing intense exercises on a daily basis can have harmful effects, such as muscle/tendon strains, loss of lean tissue, and fitness-level plateaus. However, if you don’t exercise at all, your muscles will become flabby and weak, your heart and lungs won’t function efficiently, and your joints will be stiff and easily injured.

If you are overweight or obese, your fitness goals probably go beyond lowering your risk for disease, but even if losing weight is your primary goal, it’s nice to know what research actually shows when it comes to how much exercise you should be doing each week for better health.

Here are a few statistics to consider:

  • 30 minutes of interval training per week (broken into 3 workouts) reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week reduces the risk of cancer.
  • 120 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week offers improvements in memory.

People seem to have heard the message that you need 30 minutes of exercise, five days a Exercise tracking device Dollarphotoclub_101019544 (2)week according to federal guidelines. If you get that, you’ll get 85% of the health benefits we talk about. However, the misconception is that it’s all or nothing. It’s also important to note that federal guidelines call for moderate-intensity exercise, which means you don’t have to be killing yourself with long runs, boot camp, or spin class five days a week in order to relish the rewards. Being consistent with exercise is probably the most important factor in achieving desired results.

If you’re obese and looking for ways to get fit and lower your risk of disease, schedule an appointment at VIP SURG. We can help you find the right treatment.

Gastric Bypass for a Longer Life

According to research by the Geisinger Health System, one of the largest health service organizations in the U.S., patients with severe obesity who have gastric bypass surgery reduce their risk of dying from obesity and other diseases by 48% up to 10 years after surgery, compared to similar patients who do not undergo the procedure. This is significant considering that the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimates about 24 million Americans have severe obesity, which would mean a BMI of 35 or more with an obesity-related condition like diabetes or a BMI of 40.

Researchers from the Geisinger Health System followed nearly 2,700 patients who had gastric bypass at the system’s nationally accredited bariatric surgery center between 2004 and 2014. Mortality benefits began to emerge within two years after surgery and were significant within four years. The biggest reduction in risk occurred in patients 60 years or older at the time of surgery and in patients who had diabetes before surgery.

“The long-term survival benefits these older patients and those with diabetes experience likely relate to improvements in long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health, among other risk factors,” said Michelle R. Lent, Ph.D., a Geisinger Obesity Institute researcher. “While this study did not evaluate specific-cause mortality, as expected, we did find significant improvements or remission in diabetes and high blood pressure.”

In the study, more than 60 percent of patients with diabetes before surgery experienced diabetes remission about five years after surgery. Previous studies have shown death from heart disease and even certain cancers are lower in gastric bypass patients than patients with severe obesity who do not have the operation.

People with obesity and severe obesity have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis, sleep apnea, high blood pressure and dozens of other diseases and conditions. Studies have shown individuals with a BMI greater than 30 have a 50 to 100 percent greater risk of premature death compared to healthy weight individuals.Live Longer

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are interested in learning what bariatric surgery can do for you, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team of experts can help you choose the best treatment for your unique situation.

 

Robotic Gallbladder Surgery

A horrendous pain hits you in the upper right side or middle of the abdomen. You might think it’s a gas pain because your abdomen might feel especially full, or maybe it’s bad indigestion because you are also very nauseous and vomiting. These are all symptoms of a problem with the gallbladder. If the pain and/or nausea isn’t enough to send you to your doctor or the emergency room, symptoms such as fever, clay-colored stool, or yellowing of skin and whites of eyes (jaundice) should be assessed by a medical professional as soon as possible.

Gallbladder disease is very common, affecting about 10-15% of adults in Europe and the U.S. Treatment for gallbladder disease may include lifestyle changes and medication. However, if your symptoms worsen, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove your gallbladder.

Fortunately, your gallbladder is an organ that you can live without. The surgery to remove Gallbladderthe gallbladder is called a cholecystectomy. This surgery can be performed using open surgery through one large incision or through minimally invasive surgery (laparoscopy). Minimally invasive surgery can be done either through a few small incisions in your abdomen or one incision in your belly button. In laparoscopic procedures, surgeons use long-handled instruments to reach your gallbladder. One of the instruments is a tiny camera that takes images inside your body and sends them to a video monitor to guide surgeons as they operate.

Cholecystectomy through the belly button can be done using traditional single incision laparoscopy or da Vinci® Single-Site® Surgery. The da Vinci System features a magnified 3D high-definition vision system and flexible Single-Site instruments. These features enable your doctor to operate with enhanced vision and precision.

It is important to discuss all treatment and surgical options with your doctor, as well as the risks and benefits of each. If your doctor believes you are a candidate for da Vinci Single-Site Surgery, your doctor removes your gallbladder using state-of-the-art precision instruments. With da Vinci, surgery is performed through one incision in the belly button, which dramatically limits visible scarring.

As a result of da Vinci technology, da Vinci Single-Site Cholecystectomy offers the following potential benefits compared to traditional laparoscopy:

  • Low rate of major complications
  • Low conversion rate to open surgery
  • Virtually scarless surgery
  • High patient satisfaction
  • Minimal pain

Though it is often called a “robot,” da Vinci cannot act on its own. Surgery is performed entirely by your doctor. This state-of-the-art technology must be operated by an experienced and specially trained surgeon like Dr. Tsuda.

If you need gallbladder surgery, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda to see if you are a candidate for this type of procedure. Da Vinci surgery allows one to get back to normal life much more quickly than with traditional open and even laparoscopic surgeries.

Treat Your Obesity to Solve These Potential Health Issues

Measuring waist AdobeStock_90560299.jpegObesity is a complex health issue to address. It results from a combination of causes and contributing factors, including individual factors such as behavior and genetics. Behaviors can include dietary patterns, inactivity, medication use, and other exposures. Obesity is a serious concern because it is associated with poorer mental health outcomes and reduced quality of life. Obesity is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. and worldwide, along with its accompanying ailments including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancer.

People who are obese, compared to those with a normal or healthy weight, are at increased risk for many serious diseases and health conditions, including the following:

  • All-causes of death (mortality)
  • High blood pressure (Hypertension)
  • High LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, or high levels of triglycerides (Dyslipidemia)
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Osteoarthritis (a breakdown of cartilage and bone within a joint)
  • Sleep apnea and breathing problems
  • Some cancers (endometrial, breast, colon, kidney, gallbladder, and liver)
  • Low quality of life
  • Mental illness such as clinical depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders
  • Body pain and difficulty with physical functioning

Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. You can develop any one of these risk factors by itself, but they tend to occur together. A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is made if you have at least three of the following risk factors:

  • A large waistline. This is called abdominal obesity or “having an apple shape.” Having extra fat in the waist area is a greater risk factor for CHD than having extra fat in other parts of the body, such as on the hips.
  • A higher than normal triglyceride level (or you’re on medicine to treat high triglycerides).
  • A lower than normal HDL cholesterol level (or you’re on medicine to treat low HDL cholesterol).
  • Higher than normal blood pressure (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood pressure).
  • Higher than normal fasting blood sugar (or you’re on medicine to treat diabetes).

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for treatments for your obesity and metabolic syndrome, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team of experts can help you explore all of the options.