Diet Recommendations for After Weight-Loss Surgery

A gastric bypass diet helps people who are recovering from sleeve gastrectomy and from gastric bypass surgery — also known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass — to heal and to change their eating habits. Your doctor or a registered dietitian can talk with you about the diet you’ll need to follow after surgery, explaining what types of food and how much you can eat at each meal. Closely following your gastric bypass diet can help you lose weight safely and keep you feeling well too.

The gastric bypass diet is designed to:

  • Allow your stomach to heal without being stretched by the food you eat
  • Accustom you to eating the smaller amounts of food that your smaller stomach can comfortably and safely digest
  • Help you lose weight and avoid gaining weight
  • Avoid side effects and complications from the surgery

Diet recommendations after gastric bypass surgery vary depending on your individual situation. A gastric bypass diet typically follows a staged approach to help you ease back into eating solid foods. How quickly you move from one step to the next depends on how fast your body heals and adjusts to the change in eating patterns. At each stage of the gastric bypass diet, you must be careful to:

  • Avoid dehydration.
  • Wait about 30 minutes after a meal to drink anything and avoid drinking 30 minutes before a meal.
  • Eat and drink slowly, to avoid dumping syndrome — which occurs when foods and liquids enter your small intestine rapidly and in larger amounts than normal, causing nausea, vomiting, dizziness, sweating and diarrhea.
  • Eat lean, protein-rich foods daily.
  • Choose foods and drinks that are low in fats and sugar.
  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Limit caffeine, which can cause dehydration.
  • Take vitamin and mineral supplements daily as directed by your health provider.
  • Chew foods thoroughly to a pureed consistency before swallowing, once you progress beyond liquids only.

The gastric bypass diet can help you recover from surgery and transition to a way of eating that is healthy and supports your weight-loss goals. Remember that if you return to unhealthy eating habits after weight-loss surgery, you may not lose all your excess weight, or you may regain any weight that you do lose.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule a consultation with VIPSurg. Dr. Tsuda and his team are ready to help you on your way to a healthier, happier life.

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Obesity is a Big Deal! A Look at the Complexity of this Serious Health Problem

Let’s face it, often those of us who are overweight or obese are judged quite harshly by society. People generally assume that obesity is strictly a matter of personal willpower, the product of bad choices about physical activity and diet. It is assumed that an overweight or obese person has little self-control. This kind of bias and thinking gets in the way of dealing with obesity as the serious health issue it is.

Obesity is a very complicated condition. About 50 to 70% of one’s risk of obesity is genetically determined. You can make choices that make it better or worse, but that’s just like any other chronic disease. When the blame and shame that are so common get in the way, it makes it hard to improve the health of people living with obesity.

A lot of health plans have had broad, blanket exclusions for obesity, thinking that it is a cosmetic condition. However, the rise in the prevalence of obesity that’s happened over the last 3 decades has made it clear that it’s creating a trend of chronic disease ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes to many cancers.

Because weight-based stereotypes and prejudices so often emerge from claims that obesity is caused and maintained by personal characteristics such as laziness or lack of willpower, there is a clear need for increased public awareness and education about the complex biology of obesity and the significant obstacles that exist in efforts to achieve sustainable weight loss. The prevailing societal and media messages that reinforce blame on obese persons need to be replaced with messages that obesity is a chronic disease with a complex set of causes. It is a lifelong condition for most obese persons.

Several studies have consistently demonstrated that experiencing weight stigma increases the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy eating behaviors and lower levels of physical activity, both of which exacerbate obesity and weight gain. Among youths, several studies have demonstrated that overweight children who experience weight-based teasing are more likely to engage in binge-eating and unhealthy weight control behaviors compared with overweight peers who are not teased, even after controlling for variables such as BMI and socioeconomic status. Other research has consistently documented a positive association between weight-based victimization and eating disorder symptoms and bulimia. Weight-based victimization among overweight youths has been linked to lower levels of physical activity, negative attitudes about sports, and lower participation in physical activity among overweight students.

If you’re looking for treatment for this very real, physical disease, contact VIPSurg for an appointment. Our expert team understands the complexity of obesity and all the issues that come with it. They can help find the right treatment for you.

Obese woman thinking

Is Weight-Loss Surgery Right for You?

Weight-loss surgery, also known as bariatric surgery, is a safe and effective treatment for individuals suffering from morbid obesity, a serious health condition that can interfere with basic physical functions such as breathing or walking. Obesity puts people at greater risk for illnesses including diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gallstones, osteoarthritis, heart disease, and cancer.

To be considered morbidly obese, you must have a BMI of 40 or more or be 35 or more and experiencing obesity-related health conditions, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. These are important for qualifying for a bariatric procedure.

People seeking weight-loss surgery are not usually considered candidates unless they have tried and failed to lose weight through traditional forms of treatment. People at high risk for disease or who have a life-threatening condition, including those with a disabling condition from obesity, are often considered good candidates for surgeries such as gastric bypass. People with a genetic condition that causes obesity are candidates as well.

Are you a candidate?

Weight-loss surgery may be right for you if:

  • Your BMI of 40 or more.
  • Your BMI is 35 or higher, and you also suffer from one or more health problem such as Type 2 Diabetes or Hypertension.
  • Your past attempts to lose weight have been unsuccessful.
  • You do not have any other disease that may have caused your obesity.
  • You are prepared to make substantial changes in your eating habits and lifestyle.

Other guidelines can include an extremely high body mass index, obesity that exists for five or more years, no history of alcohol or drug abuse, and no untreated psychiatric disorder. Candidates are typically between the ages of 18 and 65. Certain adolescents may be eligible for weight loss surgery, too.

Being a good candidate means having realistic expectations. Weight-loss surgery can help reduce your risk of life-threatening conditions and improve your overall health and appearance, and these changes should improve your quality of life; however, surgery alone is often not enough to turn your life around. Significant behavior modifications are necessary.

To decide about the gastric bypass procedure and to find out if you are a good candidate for weight loss surgery, talk to the doctors at VIP SURG. Their experts can help you find the right weight-loss treatment for your unique situation.

Bariatric Surgery - medical concept

Aging and Obesity: Is Bariatric Surgery an Option for the Elderly Patient?

The good news is that improved life expectancy is allowing baby boomers to enter their golden years in unprecedented numbers. The bad news is that rates of obesity among this aging demographic are climbing in never-before-seen numbers as well, putting this population at risk of developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes, lower extremity arthritis, sleep apnea, and stroke, all of which can lead to disability. Treatment guidelines to lose weight in the elderly have been difficult to define, yet it is very clear that obesity in the elderly contributes to worsening of multiple parameters which along with the metabolic problems mentioned already, include cognition, functionality and quality of life. While ample evidence supports the safety and effectiveness of weight-loss aka bariatric surgery in the general adult population, more information is needed in patients age 60 years and older.

Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; this is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population.

The risk of any surgical intervention increases as one gets older. However, weight-loss surgery is very safe, and the potential benefits routinely outweigh any of the associated risks if there are no other health issues that would dramatically increase the risk of surgery.

Ideally, a comprehensive assessment would focus on psychosocial and functional status in addition to physical data. An excellent support system of family, friends, or caregiver resources is imperative. The selected patient should be capable of engaging in physical interventions focusing on mitigating muscle loss and osteoporosis and of maintaining changes in eating behavior as needed as well. A recommended “pre-habilitation” program may include a physical therapist to assist with strength and endurance training and a nutritionist to aide in enhancing protein intake, vitamin D, and other nutrient sufficiency.

Identifying goals of care, quality of life, and improved function should be considered as primary objectives of undergoing surgery. Goals of the surgery include not only weight loss but also improvements in physiological function, comorbidity, and quality of life, and reduction in institutionalization.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, VIPSurg is here to help. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Old obese woman walking with stick

 

 

 

Obesity in America: The Unhealthy Truth

Most Americans are overweight. Most – let that sink in for a minute. The majority of American adults are at least carrying around a few more pounds than is considered healthy. Severe obesity is also on the rise across the country. Unfortunately, these stats tell a story that won’t have a happy ending unless something changes:

  • Nearly 40% of adults and close to 20% of adolescents are obese in America. 
  • A body that is 20% overweight is prone to major health problems. 
  • Life expectancy is greatly reduced in someone who is obese.
  • The obesity problem is growing everywhere, but rural areas tend to have both higher obesity rates and much greater rates of what medical researchers term “severe obesity,” which is a BMI of 40 or more.

The main concern with this alarming trend is that being overweight affects all areas of your health. Carrying around extra weight not only make you feel heavy, but it also contributes to other health problems like sleep apnea, diabetes, high cholesterol, painful joints, and heart disease.

 The good news is that these risk factors can be eliminated by losing weight and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The bad news is that changing behavior long-term is extremely difficult for all but the most committed. For the very obese, even commitment and willpower often aren’t enough.

Eating the wrong foods, eating too much food, lack of exercise, genetics, stress, emotional eating, and a slow metabolism are the major contributing factors in obesity. Nevertheless, even though we are more aware than ever that nutrition and health value should be playing a bigger role in our selections when it comes to choosing what we eat, most Americans surveyed still listed convenience as their number 1 priority when deciding.

Whatever its causes, believing severe obesity can be managed or eliminated by having a low-fat diet and engaging in exercise is a bit naïve. When a person is 50, 70, or 100+ pounds overweight, it can be difficult to impossible to diet and exercise enough to lose the troublesome weight. 

Unfortunately, diet, exercise, and weight-loss pills are generally ineffective for severely obese people. Studies have demonstrated that when the BMI reaches 40, the chances of success with medical therapy for weight loss are approximately 1%. 

Since 1991, the National Institute of Health has supported bariatric surgery as a treatment for morbid obesity when combined with a healthy diet and exercise.

Surgery can help a person lose weight so that they are able to exercise better to maintain a healthy weight loss. Some obese people need weight-loss surgery because, despite drug therapy, exercise, and behavioral modifications, they still have increased risk of comorbid conditions including heart disease and diabetes. These are the people who are often candidates for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery.  

Obesity is a common and complex medical condition, losing weight isn’t easy to do, and there’s really no magic cure. If it were simple, everyone would be healthy and trim. However, if you are at an unhealthy weight, you must start somewhere. Going it alone into a crash diet isn’t a good idea. You will put the weight back on, and chances are you’ll gain even more than you lost. Checking with your doctor, who can advise you on a plan that is safe and right for you, is a good way to begin your journey to a healthier, happier you.  

If you’ve tried diet and exercise but still aren’t losing the weight you need to lose to be healthy, schedule an appointment with VIPSurg. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can help find the right treatment for you.

Lady eats hamburger

Weight-loss Surgery or Diet and Exercise? Long-term Results Can Save Your Life

To maintain a healthy weight medical professionals emphasize that diet and exercise are key. If you want to lose weight, you must control calories and expend more by exercising. This has been the standard approach for decades. Recent research is telling a different story.

A growing number of studies, including one published in Medical News Today, are finding that for those who are obese, weight-loss/bariatric surgery may be more effective at reducing body weight than the old idea of changing habits and watching what you eat. The findings also suggested that bariatric surgery also increased remission rates in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes as well as heart disease.

 Bariatric surgery helps you lose weight and lowers your overall risk of associated medical problems in one of two ways:

  • Restriction. Surgery is used to physically limit the amount of food the stomach can hold, which limits the number of calories you can eat.
  • Limiting the absorption of nutrients including calories. Surgery is used to shorten or bypass part of the small intestine, reducing the amount of nutrients and number of calories the body absorbs.

Some of the more popular weight-loss surgeries are:

  • Gastric bypass – involves the creation of a small pouch in the top of the stomach. The pouch is the only part of the stomach that receives food. The small intestine is then cut a short distance below the main stomach and connected to the new pouch. Because food now bypasses a portion of the small intestines, absorption and calories are reduced.
  • Gastric banding – involves placing an inflatable balloon (band) around the top part of the stomach; this creates a small stomach pouch above the band with a narrow opening to the rest of the stomach. A port is then installed under the skin. By injecting or removing fluid, the band/balloon can be inflated or deflated, controlling the amount of food the stomach can hold.
  • Sleeve gastrectomy – In this approach, part of the stomach is separated and removed. The remaining section is formed into a tube-like structure; the smaller stomach cannot hold as much food. It also affects the production of hormones that produce hunger.

Why does bariatric surgery appear to be the preferred option over other weight loss options for those considered obese?

It appears to all come down to the success rates of changing old habits. Unfortunately, only slightly more than 5 percent of people are successful in changing their lifestyles on a long-term basis. Health experts claim that the overall risks associated with obesity which include heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and other life threatening conditions, outweigh the risks and complications of surgery.

Weight-loss surgery isn’t a magic bullet or an easy fix by any means, but research shows it may be the best answer for many people suffering from severe obesity and the deadly health conditions that often accompany it. If you’re considering bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, Dr. Tsuda and his expert team are ready to help you find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Doctor measuring obese man waist body fat. Obesity and weight loss.

Benefits of Bariatric Surgery: More than Just Weight Loss

Do you think you’d eat less if you felt full after eating just a small amount of food? That’s exactly what bariatric surgery does. That’s why people lose weight and keep it off after weight-loss surgery. Bariatric surgery reduces the stomach’s storage capacity, limiting food intake and helping you feel full much sooner than usual.

There are several types of bariatric surgery. Options include gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and gastric banding. Your doctor can help determine if you’re a candidate for one of these procedures, and, if so, which surgery is best for you.

Losing weight and keeping it off is extremely important for mitigating the potential health problems associated with obesity. You must keep the weight off for a minimum of five years to consider weight loss a success and one that can result in potentially lifesaving benefits resulting in a healthier you.

Benefits of sustained weight loss through bariatric surgery include:

  • Long-term remission for type 2 diabetes. A recent Cleveland Clinic study suggests that bariatric surgery causes long-term remission of difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes. The results of this study show the procedure is highly effective for obese patients with type 2 diabetes, allowing almost all patients to remain free of insulin and adjunct medications for at least three years after surgery.
  • Improved cardiovascular health. Weight loss surgery decreases a person’s risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral heart disease. Blood pressure and cholesterol levels can return to normal, or near normal after surgery, reducing these risks and improving overall well-being, 
  • Relief of depression. Many obese people feel depressed because of poor body image and social stigma. Even younger people who carry significant excess weight find it difficult to participate in activities they might otherwise enjoy, leading to social isolation and depression. Losing this excess weight can improve emotional health in these patients.
  • Eliminate obstructive sleep apnea. Achieving and sustaining a normal weight range often allows people with sleep apnea to stop using a CPAP machine at bedtime.
  • Joint pain relief. Carrying around excessive weight puts a lot of stress on your weight-bearing joints, often causing chronic pain and joint damage. The significant and sustained weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery relieves the stress on joints and often allows people to stop using pain medications and enjoy much more mobility, 
  • Improve fertility. Weight loss surgery can also improve fertility during childbearing years.
  • Alleviate other medical conditions. Weight loss surgery can alleviate metabolic syndrome, pregnancy complications, gallbladder disease, and more.

To learn more about bariatric surgery and if it might be right for you, contact VIPSurg for a consultation. Dr. Tsuda and his team of experts can help find the proper treatment for your unique situation.

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