The Role of Genes in Obesity

Genes influence every aspect of human development, physiology, and adaptation, and research shows that genetics also play a role in obesity. However, we still know relatively little when it comes to which specific genes contribute to obesity. Nor do we know the importance of the complex interplay between our genetic makeup and our life experiences.

Obesity Word DNA Strand Medical Research Fat HereditaryWhat we do know is that genes do not always predict one’s future health. Genes and behavior probably are both needed for a person to be overweight. In some cases, various genes may increase one’s susceptibility for obesity and require outside factors such as plentiful food supply or not enough physical activity.

It’s well established that overweight and the different forms of obesity are conditions tending to center within a family. A person with a family history has a two to eight times higher risk than a person with no family history of obesity, and even higher risk is observed in cases of severe obesity.

The most common forms of obesity are probably the result of variations within a large number of genes. Sequence variations within a pool of 56 different genes have been reported as being related to obesity; however, only ten of those genes showed positive results in at least five different studies.

Any attempt to explain the obesity epidemic has to consider both genetics and how (the environment) one lives as well. One explanation that is often cited is that the same genes that helped our ancestors survive occasional famines are now being challenged by environments in which food is plentiful year-round.

As of now, genetic tests are not useful for directing personal diet or physical activity regimens. Studies on genetic variation affecting response to changes in diet and physical activity are still at an early stage. It stands to reason that doing a better job of explaining obesity in terms of genes and environmental factors could help encourage people who are trying to achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

Obesity is a serious public health problem because it is associated with some of the leading causes of death in the U.S. and worldwide, including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancer, but unfortunately, families can’t change their genes. They can, however, change the family environment to encourage healthier eating habits and more physical activity. Those changes can improve the health of family members and the family health history of the next generation.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are interested in weight-loss surgery, schedule a consultation at VIP Surg.

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Tips for Finding the Right Surgeon for You

Almost any surgery can cause serious complications, so you always want to be in good surgical hands. With so many doctors, how do you know which is the right surgeon for you?

One indicator to note is how often surgeons perform a procedure. That can be vital for operations that are relatively new, such as gastric bypass surgery for treating obesity. While many surgeons have started performing the operation, not all are qualified. A September 2009 study found that the risk of serious complications from the most common form of gastric bypass surgery fell by 10 percent for every additional 10 cases per year the surgeon had performed.

However, quantity isn’t the only or even most important measure of quality. A May 2009 study of 81,289 adults who had heart bypass surgery, for example, found that success depended more on how well surgeons and hospitals adhered to various markers of surgical excellence—such as using the appropriate technique during the operation and prescribing the right medications before and afterward—than the number of procedures performed.

Don’t be afraid to question your doctor. Ask your prospective surgeon these questions before going under the knife:

  • Is surgery really necessary? The best way to avoid surgical errors is to avoid surgery entirely, so ask about the effectiveness and safety of alternatives. Compare those with the risks of surgery and the chance that it will help you.
  • Is your board certification up to date? Look for a surgeon who has undergone the necessary training, even after being in clinical practice, to maintain board certification in his or her specialty.
  • What’s your experience? Ask how many operations the surgeon has performed in the past year and how that compares with his or her peers. You don’t have to find the busiest, most experienced surgeon in North America, but it’s important to avoid the doctor who does very few of the procedures, especially in a place that does very few.
  • What are your success, failure, and complication rates? Not all will be able or willing to tell you, but the good ones should be.
  • What’s the hospital’s infection rate? Seventeen states now make that information public, and many hospitals report their rates voluntarily.

doctor-650534_960_720Just remember to worry less about bedside manner and more about the final outcome. If you have to choose between a nice surgeon and a highly skilled surgeon, the skilled surgeon is the better bet.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a surgeon who is both compassionate and highly skilled, Dr. Tsuda at VIP Surg is everything you’re searching for. Whether you have general surgery needs or are interested in bariatric surgery, he and his team of experts have the experience and skill for you to have an excellent outcome.

Bariatric Surgery: Impacting High Blood Pressure Through More Than Weight Loss

According to the Centers for Disease Control, about one in three U.S. adults has high blood pressure (hypertension). Risks include family history, advancing age, poor diet, consuming excessive amounts of alcohol, and being overweight or obese.

Lifestyle changes are a big part of controlling high blood pressure. The main tenets include:

  • Following a healthy diet, which may include reducing salt. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is often recommended. In addition to lowering salt intake, DASH is replete with fruits, vegetables, and low-fat or nonfat dairy. The diet emphasizes whole grains and is rich in potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber.
  • Exercising regularly.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Keeping stress levels at bay. (Stress can cause us to engage in unhealthy blood pressure-raising behaviors.)
  • Drinking only moderate amounts of alcohol.
  • Taking your medications as prescribed.

There are many types of prescription medications that can help control blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. These medications may need to be taken for life to maintain their effect.

New research is showing, however, that bariatric surgery can allow obese people taking a lot of antihypertensive medications to cut way back on them. Study subjects’ blood pressure was maintained in the normal range with only one agent or even without drugs.

Within a year, those in a recent trial who had bariatric surgery were more than six times as likely to have cut back on their number of blood pressure (BP) medications by hypertension-867855__340about a third. Half of the surgical patients didn’t need any antihypertensive meds to maintain their BP at healthy levels. On the other hand, all of the “standard-care” patients in the study needed antihypertensive medications to keep BP that low, and half of them needed at least three different ones.

Interestingly, most patients in the gastric-bypass group achieved the primary end point in the first month of the postop period. That seems to indicate that something more is happening beyond just weight loss.

That something is likely to be related, at least in part, to the metabolic changes in the surgery group compared with the control group, which included significant improvements in fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in addition to the lowering of blood pressure.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are wondering if bariatric surgery might be right for you, schedule an appointment at VIP Surg. Dr. Tsuda and his team can help find the right treatment for your unique situation.

 

Overcoming Genetics with Bariatric Surgery

Many of us have struggled with our weight. Whether it’s those 30 pounds of baby weight that have stubbornly hung around long after the baby was born or the 50 pounds gained after a back injury, weight gain is for many a constant struggle and a sensitive subject.

However, inactivity and poor diet are not the only causes of obesity. Research estimates that genetics determines at least 40 to 50 percent of our weight. Unfortunately, the specific genes are not well understood.

How can one overcome genetics? If everyone in your family is heavy, isn’t it a foregone conclusion that you will be heavy also? Not necessarily. Fortunately, we can level the genetics playing field with weight-loss surgery.

The most popular weight loss procedure in the United States is the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The surgery is minimally invasive, takes about an hour and requires an overnight stay in the hospital for most patients. The stomach, which regularly can hold about the volume of a football, is stapled and divided so that it is the shape and size of a banana.

Weight loss is achieved because the patient can no longer eat a large volume of food, and calories are proportionately decreased. The pylorus, the muscular valve at the outlet of the stomach, is left intact in this surgery. This also helps patients who have this procedure stay full.

Besides the effects of the procedure on restricting food volume, there is increasing evidence that the mechanisms in the brain that cause hunger are permanently modified by the sleeve gastrectomy. People state that they no longer feel hungry and no longer crave some of the high-calorie foods they used to.

Weight-loss surgery is a powerful tool in the hands of the patient, but it is not an “easyfix.” Sleeve gastrectomy requires commitment to healthy food choices and exercise on the part of the patient. The exciting news is that those struggling with obesity are not doomed to a life of aches and pains, poor health, and a miserable quality of life. There is help, and there is hope.

If you are in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Dr. Tsuda, Dr. Ryan, and their expert team can help find the right treatment for you.

Overweight Woman is Overjoyed

 

Robotic Surgery Explained

Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 12.35.38 PMRobotic surgery is a type of minimally invasive surgery. “Minimally invasive” means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, we use miniaturized surgical instruments that fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure.

The surgeon controls these instruments and the camera from a console located in the operating room. Placing his fingers into the master controls, he is able to operate all four arms of the da Vinci simultaneously while looking through a stereoscopic high-definition monitor that literally places him inside the patient, giving him a better, more detailed 3-D view of the operating site than the human eye can provide. Every movement he makes with the master controls is replicated precisely by the robot. When necessary, the surgeon can even change the scale of the robot’s movements: If he selects a three-to-one scale, the tip of the robot’s arm will move just one inch for every three inches the surgeon’s hand moves. And because of the console’s design, the surgeon’s eyes and hands are always perfectly aligned with his view of the surgical site, minimizing surgeon fatigue.

The ultimate effect is to give the surgeon unprecedented control in a minimally invasive environment. Utilizing this advanced technology, surgeons are able to perform a growing number of complex surgical procedures. Since these procedures can now be performed through very small incisions, patients experience a number of benefits compared to open surgery, including:

  • Less trauma on the body
  • Minimal scarring
  • Faster recovery times

If you’re facing general or bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, contact VIP SURG to learn about how we can help. Drs. Tsuda and Ryan specialize in minimally invasive procedures and are experts in robotic surgery. Call for a consultation at 702-487-6000.

Is Obesity a Disease?

Whether or not obesity should be considered a disease is a matter of debate. In 2013, the American Medical Association, the nation’s largest group of physicians, voted to recognize obesity as a disease. The decision was controversial to say the least.

The decision was meant to improve access to weight loss treatment, reduce the stigma of obesity, and underscore the fact that obesity is not always a matter of self-control. Others argue that calling obesity a disease automatically categorizes a large portion of Americans as “sick,” when they may not be. Instead, critics say obesity should be considered a risk factor for many diseases, but not a disease in and of itself.

Experts on one side of the issue say obesity, like alcoholism, depression, and anxiety, is a disease. There are definite medical patterns: hormone imbalances, neurotransmitter deficiencies, and nutritional exhaustion that all contribute to obesity. Many patients that are obese have underlying medical issues that need to be addressed.

On the other hand, with more than one third of the American population presently classified as obese, it is clear that there are many causes for excessive fat accumulation like genetic issues, too little exercise/physical activity, too much food, inappropriate food selection, eating while watching television, etc. In many cases, obesity is the result of a specific lifestyle which can typically be reversed (at least in the short term) by adopting a different lifestyle.

Obesity increases the risk of developing a number of serious health conditions, including:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gallstones
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Infertility or irregular periods

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says people should aim to make long-term changes, such as eating healthy on a regular basis, and boosting daily physical activity. Even small amounts of weight loss — such as 5% to 10% of your total body weight – can have health benefits.

For some, obesity as a disease invalidates the importance of discipline, proper nutrition, and exercise and enables individuals with obesity to escape responsibility. For others, obesity as a disease is a bridge to additional research, coordination of effective treatment, and increased resources for weight loss.

Ultimately, obesity is a complex entity that can have many causes; some are endocrine (like thyroid malfunction or hyperfunctioning of the adrenal gland or Cushing’s syndrome), but often the condition is from a combination of inactivity and overeating. For others, there are genetic factors that produce a tendency to be overweight even with the consumption of what would be for most people an appropriate number of calories. Whether the causes are hormonal, genetic, or reside in the brain is often difficult to determine.

If you’re in the Las Vegas area and looking for treatment for obesity and the life-threatening conditions that often accompany it, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Our experts can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

Bariatric Surgery Found to Help COPD

According to estimates, 6% of American adults have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 35% of those COPD patients are considered obese. In addition to being common among COPD patients, studies have also suggested that obesity leads to a higher risk of acute exacerbations, indicating that obesity may be a risk factor. Now a U.S. study suggests that obese people with COPD who get weight loss surgery may go to the hospital less often with acute breathing problems after their operations. The study found that among obese adults with COPD, those who had bariatric surgery to lose weight, needed to go to the emergency room or have inpatient care half as often as before surgery.

The researchers examined data on 481 obese adults aged 40 to 65 who had COPD and underwent bariatric surgery in California, Florida and Nebraska. They followed patients from 2005 through 2011 to see how hospital and emergency room visits for COPD in the two years before weight loss surgery compared to the two years afterwards.

At the start of the study, when patients were 13 to 24 months away from getting their operations, 28 percent of them had an emergency department (ED) or hospital visit for acute COPD symptoms, researchers report in Chest. During the second year of the study, the 12 months right before surgery, these rates didn’t change much, but compared with that first year of the study, the chances of an ED or hospital visit dropped by 65 percentin the first year after bariatric surgery. Just 12 percent of patients had a COPD visit during that time. During the last year of the study, 13 to 24 months after surgery, the odds of an ED or hospital visit were 61 percent lower than in the first year of the study. These findings suggest that benefits of bariatric surgery may extend beyond remission of chronic health problems associated with obesity to include COPD and other respiratory conditions.

If you are considering bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, schedule a consultation at VIP SURG. Our expert team can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease health medical concept