Metabolic Syndrome: The New Silent Killer

For decades, American waistlines have been expanding, and there is increasing cause for alarm. Experts are saying metabolic syndrome is the new “silent killer,” like hypertension in the 1970s. As it turns out, the “love handle” can be fatal.

What is Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. The term “metabolic” refers to the biochemical processes involved in the body’s normal functioning. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders. When a patient presents with these conditions together, the chances for future cardiovascular disease is greater than any one factor presenting alone.

What are Metabolic Risk Factors?

Risk factors are traits, conditions, or habits that increase one’s chance of developing a disease. The five conditions described below are metabolic risk factors. You can have any one of these risk factors by itself, but they tend to occur together. You must have at least three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

  • A large waistline. This also is called abdominal obesity or “having an apple shape.” Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 11.41.55 AMExcess fat in the stomach area is a greater risk factor for heart disease than excess fat in other parts of the body, such as on the hips.
  • A high triglyceride level (or you’re on medicine to treat high triglycerides).
  • A low HDL cholesterol level (or you’re on medicine to treat low HDL cholesterol).
  • High blood pressure (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood pressure).
  • High fasting blood sugar (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood sugar).

Your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors you have. The risk of having metabolic syndrome is closely linked to overweight and obesity and a lack of physical activity.

Insulin resistance also may increase your risk for metabolic syndrome. Genetics (ethnicity and family history) and older age are other factors that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome.

Can Metabolic Syndrome be Treated?

Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a rise in obesity rates among adults, but it is possible to prevent or delay metabolic syndrome, mainly with lifestyle changes. A healthy lifestyle is a lifelong commitment. Successfully controlling metabolic syndrome requires long-term effort and teamwork with your health care providers.

When changes in lifestyle alone do not control the conditions related to metabolic syndrome, your health practitioner may prescribe medications to control blood pressure, cholesterol, and other symptoms. Carefully following your practitioner’s instructions can help prevent many of the long-term effects of metabolic syndrome. Every step counts, and your hard work and attention to these areas will make a difference in your health.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for answers to obesity and metabolic syndrome problems, schedule a consultation with VIP Surg. Dr. Tsuda and Dr. Ryan and their team of experts can help find the right treatment for you.
 

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Overcoming Genetics with Bariatric Surgery

Many of us have struggled with our weight. Whether it’s those 30 pounds of baby weight that have stubbornly hung around long after the baby was born or the 50 pounds gained after a back injury, weight gain is for many a constant struggle and a sensitive subject.

However, inactivity and poor diet are not the only causes of obesity. Research estimates that genetics determines at least 40 to 50 percent of our weight. Unfortunately, the specific genes are not well understood.

How can one overcome genetics? If everyone in your family is heavy, isn’t it a foregone conclusion that you will be heavy also? Not necessarily. Fortunately, we can level the genetics playing field with weight-loss surgery.

The most popular weight loss procedure in the United States is the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The surgery is minimally invasive, takes about an hour and requires an overnight stay in the hospital for most patients. The stomach, which regularly can hold about the volume of a football, is stapled and divided so that it is the shape and size of a banana.

Weight loss is achieved because the patient can no longer eat a large volume of food, and calories are proportionately decreased. The pylorus, the muscular valve at the outlet of the stomach, is left intact in this surgery. This also helps patients who have this procedure stay full.

Besides the effects of the procedure on restricting food volume, there is increasing evidence that the mechanisms in the brain that cause hunger are permanently modified by the sleeve gastrectomy. People state that they no longer feel hungry and no longer crave some of the high-calorie foods they used to.

Weight-loss surgery is a powerful tool in the hands of the patient, but it is not an “easyfix.” Sleeve gastrectomy requires commitment to healthy food choices and exercise on the part of the patient. The exciting news is that those struggling with obesity are not doomed to a life of aches and pains, poor health, and a miserable quality of life. There is help, and there is hope.

If you are in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Dr. Tsuda, Dr. Ryan, and their expert team can help find the right treatment for you.

Overweight Woman is Overjoyed

 

Robotic Surgery Explained

Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 12.35.38 PMRobotic surgery is a type of minimally invasive surgery. “Minimally invasive” means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, we use miniaturized surgical instruments that fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure.

The surgeon controls these instruments and the camera from a console located in the operating room. Placing his fingers into the master controls, he is able to operate all four arms of the da Vinci simultaneously while looking through a stereoscopic high-definition monitor that literally places him inside the patient, giving him a better, more detailed 3-D view of the operating site than the human eye can provide. Every movement he makes with the master controls is replicated precisely by the robot. When necessary, the surgeon can even change the scale of the robot’s movements: If he selects a three-to-one scale, the tip of the robot’s arm will move just one inch for every three inches the surgeon’s hand moves. And because of the console’s design, the surgeon’s eyes and hands are always perfectly aligned with his view of the surgical site, minimizing surgeon fatigue.

The ultimate effect is to give the surgeon unprecedented control in a minimally invasive environment. Utilizing this advanced technology, surgeons are able to perform a growing number of complex surgical procedures. Since these procedures can now be performed through very small incisions, patients experience a number of benefits compared to open surgery, including:

  • Less trauma on the body
  • Minimal scarring
  • Faster recovery times

If you’re facing general or bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, contact VIP SURG to learn about how we can help. Drs. Tsuda and Ryan specialize in minimally invasive procedures and are experts in robotic surgery. Call for a consultation at 702-487-6000.

Is Obesity a Disease?

Whether or not obesity should be considered a disease is a matter of debate. In 2013, the American Medical Association, the nation’s largest group of physicians, voted to recognize obesity as a disease. The decision was controversial to say the least.

The decision was meant to improve access to weight loss treatment, reduce the stigma of obesity, and underscore the fact that obesity is not always a matter of self-control. Others argue that calling obesity a disease automatically categorizes a large portion of Americans as “sick,” when they may not be. Instead, critics say obesity should be considered a risk factor for many diseases, but not a disease in and of itself.

Experts on one side of the issue say obesity, like alcoholism, depression, and anxiety, is a disease. There are definite medical patterns: hormone imbalances, neurotransmitter deficiencies, and nutritional exhaustion that all contribute to obesity. Many patients that are obese have underlying medical issues that need to be addressed.

On the other hand, with more than one third of the American population presently classified as obese, it is clear that there are many causes for excessive fat accumulation like genetic issues, too little exercise/physical activity, too much food, inappropriate food selection, eating while watching television, etc. In many cases, obesity is the result of a specific lifestyle which can typically be reversed (at least in the short term) by adopting a different lifestyle.

Obesity increases the risk of developing a number of serious health conditions, including:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gallstones
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Infertility or irregular periods

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says people should aim to make long-term changes, such as eating healthy on a regular basis, and boosting daily physical activity. Even small amounts of weight loss — such as 5% to 10% of your total body weight – can have health benefits.

For some, obesity as a disease invalidates the importance of discipline, proper nutrition, and exercise and enables individuals with obesity to escape responsibility. For others, obesity as a disease is a bridge to additional research, coordination of effective treatment, and increased resources for weight loss.

Ultimately, obesity is a complex entity that can have many causes; some are endocrine (like thyroid malfunction or hyperfunctioning of the adrenal gland or Cushing’s syndrome), but often the condition is from a combination of inactivity and overeating. For others, there are genetic factors that produce a tendency to be overweight even with the consumption of what would be for most people an appropriate number of calories. Whether the causes are hormonal, genetic, or reside in the brain is often difficult to determine.

If you’re in the Las Vegas area and looking for treatment for obesity and the life-threatening conditions that often accompany it, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Our experts can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

Rates of Obesity are on the Rise

The global obesity rate has nearly doubled since 1980, and there are now over 200Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 11.51.03 AM million obese men and nearly 300 million obese women, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. In the United States, more than one third of adults (or 78.6 million people) are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Obesity is usually defined by using a ratio of height to weight called body mass index (BMI), which usually correlates with a person’s level of body fat. According to the CDC, an adult with a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

At a fundamental level, obesity occurs when people regularly eat more calories than they burn, but actually a number of factors can contribute to obesity, including:

  • lack of physical activity
  • lack of sleep
  • genetics and certain medications that slow calorie burn, increase appetite, or cause water retention, such as corticosteroids, antidepressants, or some seizure medications

Modern culture, conveniences, and other environmental factors also, in part, contribute to obesity. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, environmental factors that promote obesity include:

  • oversized food portions
  • busy work schedules that don’t allow for physical activity
  • lack of access to healthy foods at supermarkets
  • lack of safe places for physical activity

Because friends share similar environments and carry out activities together that may contribute to weight gain, obesity has also been found to “spread” socially among friends according to a 2011 study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Certain health conditions also can lead to weight gain, including:

  • Hypothyroidism — an underactive thyroid gland that slows metabolism and causes fatigue and weakness
  • PCOS, or polycystic ovarian syndrome — which affects up to 10 percent of women of childbearing age and can also lead to excess body hair and reproductive problems
  • Cushing’s syndrome — which stems from an overproduction of the hormone cortisol by the adrenal glands and is characterized by weight gain in the upper body, face and neck
  • Prader-Willi syndrome– a rare condition in which people never feel full, and so they want to eat constantly, according to the Mayo Clinic

Although there are lots of fad diets, such short-term dietary changes are not the best way to maintain a healthy weight, the CDC says. Instead, people should aim to make long-term changes, such as eating healthy on a regular basis, and boosting daily physical activity. Even small amounts of weight loss — such as 5 to 10 percent of your total body weight – can have health benefits, the CDC says.

For people who are still severely obese after attempting to lose weight through diet and exercise, other treatments, such as bariatric surgery, may be an option. Bariatric surgery is recommended for people with a BMI of 40 or more, or if they have a serious health problem related to their obesity and have a BMI of 35 or more. In many cases, people with a BMI of 30 or more are eligible for one type of bariatric surgery if they also have at least one health problem linked with obesity.

If you’re struggling with obesity and live in the Las Vegas area, schedule an appointment with VIP Surg. Our experts can help find the right treatment for you.

 

Exercise: How Much is Enough?

Our bodies were meant to move — they actually crave exercise. As a matter of fact, regular exercise is necessary for physical fitness and good health. It reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes and other diseases, and it can improve your appearance and delay the aging process. So why aren’t we all doing it?

Many say lack of time is their single biggest obstacle to fitness, but experts say you may be overestimating how much exercise you really need to get at one time. Many think exercise means you have to hit the point where you’re completely out of breath and panting after you’ve finished, and you can do that, but for the majority of health benefits, it’s not necessary.

People often assume that more is better. On the contrary; doing too much too soon or performing intense exercises on a daily basis can have harmful effects, such as muscle/tendon strains, loss of lean tissue, and fitness-level plateaus. However, if you don’t exercise at all, your muscles will become flabby and weak, your heart and lungs won’t function efficiently, and your joints will be stiff and easily injured.

If you are overweight or obese, your fitness goals probably go beyond lowering your risk for disease, but even if losing weight is your primary goal, it’s nice to know what research actually shows when it comes to how much exercise you should be doing each week for better health.

Here are a few statistics to consider:

  • 30 minutes of interval training per week (broken into 3 workouts) reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week reduces the risk of cancer.
  • 120 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week offers improvements in memory.

People seem to have heard the message that you need 30 minutes of exercise, five days a Exercise tracking device Dollarphotoclub_101019544 (2)week according to federal guidelines. If you get that, you’ll get 85% of the health benefits we talk about. However, the misconception is that it’s all or nothing. It’s also important to note that federal guidelines call for moderate-intensity exercise, which means you don’t have to be killing yourself with long runs, boot camp, or spin class five days a week in order to relish the rewards. Being consistent with exercise is probably the most important factor in achieving desired results.

If you’re obese and looking for ways to get fit and lower your risk of disease, schedule an appointment at VIP SURG. We can help you find the right treatment.

Weight Loss after Gallbladder Surgery

If you have a tendency to develop painful gallstones, the remedy is usually removal of the gallbladder. This procedure is called a cholecystectomy. The gallbladder is the part of your digestive system that stores bile, which is produced in the liver. Bile helps with the digestion of fatty foods. Removing the gallbladder doesn’t stop the liver from making the bile necessary to digest fats. Instead of being stored in the gallbladder, the bile will continuously drip into your digestive system. Your digestive system will continue to function without a gallbladder. The surgery may affect your weight in the short term, but certain lifestyle changes may help you lose or maintain weight in the long term.3D illustration of male Gallbladder.

Fast facts on weight loss after gallbladder removal:

  • A person can live without their gallbladder.
  • When gallstones become a problem, surgery is usually required to remove the gallbladder.
  • It is not uncommon for people to lose a little weight after having a cholecystectomy.
  • There are several strategies, including exercise and diet that can be used to make this short-term weight loss a more permanent change.

There seems to be some connection between diet and gallstones. For example, obesity and rapid weight loss are risk factors for developing gallstones. There’s also an increased risk for gallstones if you have a diet high in refined carbohydrates and calories, but low in fiber.

After having your gallbladder removed, it’s quite possible that you’ll experience some weight loss. This may be because of:

  • Eliminating fatty foods: After surgery, you may have some trouble digesting fatty foods until your body adjusts. For that reason, your surgeon may instruct you to avoid high-fat and fried foods until your body is better able to handle them.
  • Eating a bland diet: During recovery, you may also find that spicy foods and foods that cause gas can lead to gastrointestinal upset. This can make you shy away from some of your favorite dishes.
  • Selecting smaller portions: For a few weeks after surgery, you may not be able to eat large amounts of food at one sitting. You’ll probably be advised to eat more frequent, but smaller meals.

During this time, you might be taking in fewer calories than you were before the surgery. If so, you’re likely to lose weight, at least temporarily. If you want to continue the trend, remember that short-term and quick weight-loss plans are not healthy and may make matters worse in the long run. Instead, strive to make weight loss part of an overall healthier way of living. That means making good dietary choices and engaging in regular exercise. It doesn’t mean starving or completely depriving yourself of the foods you love.

Living an active lifestyle is essential for weight loss after gallbladder removal. However, it is important to speak with your doctor about when it is appropriate to return to or begin an exercise routine after surgery. Someone with a significant amount of weight to lose should speak with their doctor for advice and support.

Despite having your gallbladder removed, it’s still possible to lose weight. If you have a lot of weight to lose, schedule a consultation with VIP SURG to learn how you can do it safely.