Reboot your Exercise Routine for Spring

With warmer temperatures and sunny days, spring is the ideal time to reboot your exercise schedule. Your favorite running trails are calling, and suddenly, those morning fitness classes don’t seem too early. Most of you have been working hard in the gym since you committed to your New Year’s goals, and the weekly treadmill and indoor aerobic classes may have lost their appeal. If you’re ready for some fun and fresh exercise changes to keep you motivated, try just a few changes to your weekly routine, and you’ll be reinvigorated to stick to your fitness goals and jump into the spring season.

  • Get outside
    • Get off the treadmill once or twice a week and take your cardio outdoors.
    • exercising outdoors may improve energy levels and decrease stress to a greater extent than working out inside.

If taking your workout out of the gym doesn’t work for you, there are still plenty of ways to get out of an exercise rut:

  • If you do spinning, try yoga.
    • Cycling is predominantly a cardiovascular activity that is focused on the lower body and core. Yoga poses will strengthen your upper body, reverse the postural imbalance of the forward flexion associated with cycling and open up your hips for a more mobile body (and will make your cycling classes more productive!).
  • If you do yoga, try resistance training.Spring flatlay composition with sport equipment and tulips.
    • Throw in some dumbbells, resistance bands, kettlebells, or Body Bars — anything to add in external resistance to a workout. Yoga is definitely a strength builder, but rock your workout by trying integrated and compound resistance training to build lean muscle.
  • If you do Pilates, try high intensity interval training (aka HIIT).
    • A major portion of Pilates programming is either performed on a mat or specialized equipment and often lacks a metabolic component. Adding some high intensity interval training will boost metabolism, increase aerobic capacity, and aid in weight management.

The possibilities are endless. Inside or outside? Yoga or cycling? In the end, you don’t have to choose just one. Some workout groups exist entirely outdoors, and spring is a great time to try one of those. The truth is that mixing up indoor and outdoor sessions and different types of activities is a great way to keep exercise exciting and fun.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a weight-loss surgeon, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for a consultation. He and his expert team will help find the right treatment for you.

Gastric Bypass for a Longer Life

According to research by the Geisinger Health System, one of the largest health service organizations in the U.S., patients with severe obesity who have gastric bypass surgery reduce their risk of dying from obesity and other diseases by 48% up to 10 years after surgery, compared to similar patients who do not undergo the procedure. This is significant considering that the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimates about 24 million Americans have severe obesity, which would mean a BMI of 35 or more with an obesity-related condition like diabetes or a BMI of 40.

Researchers from the Geisinger Health System followed nearly 2,700 patients who had gastric bypass at the system’s nationally accredited bariatric surgery center between 2004 and 2014. Mortality benefits began to emerge within two years after surgery and were significant within four years. The biggest reduction in risk occurred in patients 60 years or older at the time of surgery and in patients who had diabetes before surgery.

“The long-term survival benefits these older patients and those with diabetes experience likely relate to improvements in long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health, among other risk factors,” said Michelle R. Lent, Ph.D., a Geisinger Obesity Institute researcher. “While this study did not evaluate specific-cause mortality, as expected, we did find significant improvements or remission in diabetes and high blood pressure.”

In the study, more than 60 percent of patients with diabetes before surgery experienced diabetes remission about five years after surgery. Previous studies have shown death from heart disease and even certain cancers are lower in gastric bypass patients than patients with severe obesity who do not have the operation.

People with obesity and severe obesity have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis, sleep apnea, high blood pressure and dozens of other diseases and conditions. Studies have shown individuals with a BMI greater than 30 have a 50 to 100 percent greater risk of premature death compared to healthy weight individuals.Live Longer

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are interested in learning what bariatric surgery can do for you, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team of experts can help you choose the best treatment for your unique situation.

 

Tips for Choosing the Right Surgeon for You

Whether you need a complicated, invasive surgery or a simple out-patient operation, choosing the right surgeon can seem overwhelming. Even what should be relatively straightforward procedures such as gallbladder removal or hernia repair can sometimes result in serious complications, so you always want to be in good surgical hands. Here are some tips on finding the surgeon and hospital that are best for your situation.

Once you have narrowed down your list of potential surgeons, schedule a consultation. If you have a fairly urgent need for surgery, you may have to cross surgeons off of your list purely because of the wait for a visit. Otherwise, plan to meet with at least two surgeons and discuss your potential surgery.

Things to ask:

  • Is surgery necessary? The best way to avoid surgical errors is to avoid surgery entirely, so ask about the effectiveness and safety of alternatives. Compare those with the risks of surgery and the chance that it will help you.
  • Is your board certification up-to-date? Look for a surgeon who has undergone the necessary training, even after being in clinical practice, to maintain board certification in his or her specialty.
  • What’s your experience? Ask how many operations the surgeon has performed in the past year and how that compares with his or her peers.
  • What are your success, failure, and complication rates? Not all will be able or willing to tell you, but the good ones should.
  • What’s the hospital’s infection rate?
  • Does the hospital follow best practices? The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services tracks how frequently hospitals give antibiotics on schedule, control blood sugar in heart-surgery patients, prepare skin properly before incisions and take other steps proven to help prevent surgical complications.Make the right choice.

You may be expected to schedule a surgery at the end of the consultation. If you are not confident that you have found your ideal surgeon, do not schedule the surgery. Either way, it’s fine to ask for a day to consider everything the doctor has said before making the surgery official.

If the surgeon you consulted with is not your ideal surgeon, schedule a consultation with a different surgeon. Even if you think the first surgeon is your best choice, a second opinion from another surgeon can be valuable. Most types of insurance will allow for two or three consultations. If you believe you have found your ideal surgeon you can schedule your surgery, confident in your decision.

If you’re looking for an experienced general surgeon in the Las Vegas area, Dr. Shawn Tsuda specializes in minimally invasive surgical techniques including the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, foregut surgery, ventral and inguinal hernia repairs, endoscopy, and basic laparoscopy. Schedule a consultation to learn what he can do for you.

 

 

Your Chemical Romance

It’s no secret that many of us eat for emotional reasons, but did you know that research suggests that the brain circuit for eating overlaps with the brain circuit for interpersonal relationships? The neurobiology suggests that improving social relationships can actually help you lose weight. There may even be a few ways to trick the brain to achieve the same effect.

The neurotransmitter responsible for close, trusting relationships is oxytocin. Oxytocin is released by physical contact and supportive interactions with other people. Release of oxytocin increases feelings of trust and generosity. It also reduces feelings of stress and anxiety.

Amazingly, the act of eating actually releases oxytocin. In fact, eating releases oxytocin in dopamine rich brain areas, which helps explain why eating can be soothing and pleasurable. After all, part of the reason we’re drawn to emotional eating is that eating mimics the same feelings of comfort we get from close friends and family.

If you’re trying to lose weight, try boosting your oxytocin. Luckily, the best way to do that is to improve the quality and closeness of your relationships with family, friends, and significant others.

It seems like a simple suggestion, but unfortunately, problems with these relationships are often what triggers emotional eating in the first place. As a temporary measure — while you’re working on your relationships — here are a few ways to boost your oxytocin that don’t involve snacking:

  • Get a massage. Physical contact with another person is the surest way of boosting oxytocin. If you’re not in a relationship, it can be difficult to accomplish that. If you are in a relationship, then yes, your partner is a great source of oxytocin, but don’t rely on getting all your oxytocin from one person. Getting a massage releases large amounts of oxytocin, and will help you de-stress.
  • Say or do something nice for a friend. When other people trust and rely on you it boosts your oxytocin. Showing support for someone else helps that happen.
  • Pet a pet. Petting furry pets, whether it’s yours or someone else’s can help increase oxytocin. Part of it is their furry warmth, and part of it, particularly with dogs, is their trust in you. Being trusted helps increase oxytocin whether it’s a person or a dog.
  • Hug a friend. Ask a friend for a long hug, or ask them if they would like a hug. Hugs, particularly long ones, release oxytocin. In fact frequent hugging not only increases oxytocin, it also decreases blood pressure.
  • Have a conversation (in person or on the phone). The human voice can release oxytocin in ways that the written (or texted word) doesn’t.
  • Have a warm cup of tea while wrapped in a blanket. Physical warmth helps promote feelings of trust and generosity.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for ways to treat your obesity and the diseases that often accompany it, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his expert team can help you find the best treatment for your unique situation.

Happy group of diverse people, friends, family, team together

Fitness Trends for 2017

We’re more than a month into 2017, but you still might be wondering what’s trending in the fitness world this year. While the following certainly aren’t “new,” and this list includes only few of many options, these trends will be huge this year according to an annual report published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

  • wearable tech
    • Fitness trackers and smartwatches have been hot holiday gifts for the last few years, and the ACSM says that trend won’t be going anywhere in 2017—and in fact, it will only get bigger. Today’s wearables track distance, and also provide heart rate readings, GPS route tracking, move reminders, and much more. Recent updates from brands like Garmin, Apple, and Fitbit have sent the trend to number one for this year.
  • body weight training
    • It’s easy to see why no-equipment workouts are popular. They’re relatively easy to learn, they can be modified to suit any ability level, and they can be done just about anywhere. Plus, body weight exercises are an efficient way to get fit for free. Pushups and pull-ups are classic bodyweight moves, but there are plenty more to choose from, like squats, lunges, and planks, just to name a few.
  • high-intensity interval training (HIIT)
    • HIIT helps torch calories fast by alternating quick bursts of high-intensity exercise with short rest periods. It can be found in all types of workouts, from Pilates to CrossFit and boot camp classes. To try a high-intensity interval training workout yourself, spend 20 to 30 minutes total combining repeated short bursts of work with short break periods, like 45 seconds of burpees with 15 seconds of rest followed by 45 seconds of squats.

Keep in mind that in addition to helping to maintain a healthy weight, regular exercise lowers your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, dementia, and other chronic diseases, and serves as a powerful stress-reducer and mood-booster. With obesity and its accompanying health problem on the rise, using exercise as a preventive health tool is perhaps more important than ever.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for ways to treat obesity and metabolic disorder, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his expert team can help find the right treatment for you.

 

Workout Trends card with a beach on background

Obesity: The Disease that Keeps on Growing

A number of studies have shown that individuals who are obese are often stereotyped as “lazy” or “lacking in willpower.” However, obesity is no longer considered a cosmetic issue that is caused by overeating and a lack of self-control. The World Health Organization (W.H.O.), along with National and International medical and scientific societies, now recognize obesity as a chronic progressive disease resulting from multiple environmental and genetic factors.

In the United States, epidemiological data from a study that measured the actual body size of thousands of Americans, showed that 34 percent of adults more than 20 years old are affected by obesity and 68 percent are overweight (2007-2008 data). Obesity affected 10 percent of children between two and five years of age, 2 percent of those between 6 to 11 years old, and 18 percent of adolescents.

Throughout the last 3 decades, the prevalence of obesity has been increasing at an alarming rate. Since 1985, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has supported an ongoing study, conducted on a yearly basis by state health departments, to examine changes in obesity prevalence state-to-state, and has found the following:

  • In 1990, the obesity prevalence for most of the states was 10 percent or less.
  • By 1995, more than half the states had a prevalence of 15 percent.
  • By 2000, nearly half the states had a prevalence of 20 percent or higher.
  • Five years later (2005), all but three states had a prevalence greater than 20 percent and nearly a third had a prevalence of 25 percent or more.
  • By 2010, the data show that most of U.S. states had a prevalence of 25 percent and many had a prevalence of 30 percent or higher.

Obesity is considered a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Acting upon a genetic background are a number of hormonal, metabolic, psychological, cultural and behavioral factors that promote fat accumulation and weight gain.

Many other conditions associated with obesity contribute to the progression of the AdobeStock_69574863 (2).jpgdisease. Obesity reduces mobility and the number of calories that would be burned in the performance of activity. Weight gain may also cause psychological or emotional distress which, in turn, produces hormonal changes that may cause further weight gain by stimulating appetite and by increasing fat uptake into fat storage depots.

Sleep duration is reduced by weight gain due to a number of conditions that impair sleep quality such as pain, sleep apnea and other breathing problems, a need to urinate more frequently, use of certain medications, and altered regulation of body temperature. Shortened sleep duration, in turn, produces certain hormones that both stimulate appetite and increase the uptake of fat into fat storage depots.

Weight gain also contributes to the development of other diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis and depression, and these conditions are often treated with medications that contribute to even further weight gain. In all of these ways and more, obesity ’begets’ obesity, trapping the individual in a vicious weight gain cycle.

Multiple factors acting upon a genetic background cause weight gain and obesity. Conditions associated with weight gain and biological changes in the body that occur as a result of weight gain contribute to progression of the disease, often trapping the individual in a vicious weight gain cycle. Obesity is a complex disease influenced by several issues, including genetic, physiological, environmental, and behavioral.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are concerned about your weight, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda to learn more about how to improve your weight and health.

 

Get the Facts about Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery is an option that many obesity medicine specialists say is too often ignored or dismissed. Yet it is the only option that almost always works to help very heavy people lose a lot of weight. Weight-loss surgery can also make some chronic conditions vanish entirely.

Here are some facts about bariatric surgery and what it does:

  • Twenty-four million, Americans are eligible for bariatric surgery according to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. The criteria are a body mass index (BMI) above 40, or a BMI of at least 35 along with other medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, or acid reflux.
  • Fewer than 200,000 have the surgery each year.
  • There are four surgical types in use today. The two most popular procedures are the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the gastric sleeve. Both make the stomach smaller. The bypass also reroutes the small intestine. A simpler procedure, the gastric band, is less effective and has fallen out of favor. And a much more drastic operation, the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, which bypasses a large part of the small intestine, is rarely used because it has higher mortality and complication rates.
  • The average cost of a sleeve gastrectomy is $16,000 to $19,000, and the average cost of a gastric bypass is $20,000 to $25,000. Most insurance plans cover the cost for patients who qualify, though some plans require that patients try dieting for a certain amount of time first.
  • Bariatric surgery is not a magic bullet that will solve all of your weight-related problems. Leading a healthy lifestyle full of healthy foods and exercise post surgery is crucial.

If you live in the Las Vegas area, have a BMI above 40 or any of the other conditions mentioned above, schedule a consultation with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his expert team can help you find the treatment that’s right for you.

AdobeStock_125554661.jpeg