Start Small for Big Results

If you are obese or overweight, exercise can be a tricky topic. Often, working out with extra weight becomes a vicious, negative cycle. Excess body weight puts stress on your joints, bones, and connective tissue, so when you do try to start a regular exercise routine, you end up hurting yourself, making many workouts too uncomfortable or even impossible to do. However, even though your knees probably hurt, your back probably hurts, and you probably already don’t feel good, you must start somewhere.

At the risk of generalizing, often gyms just aren’t that big-person friendly. When you’re obese, walking into a space where other people are already fit can be quite intimidating. On the other hand, for some, going to the gym is what motivates them, and there are certainly good choices for overweight and obese people. Cross-trainers and recumbent bikes all alleviate impact on the joints and lower back as do swimming and aqua aerobics.

For those who wish for something that doesn’t require machines or specialized equipment, here are some simple ways to get started at home:

  • Make A Plan Find the smallest thing you can do right now and commit to doing it every day. “Today I will walk around the block.” Or “Today I will spend 10 minutes doing chair exercises.”  Once you’ve met your small goal for the week, you can always add just a little more to it.
  • Enlist Support — Find someone in your life – a colleague, family member, or next-door neighbor – who will support and encourage you. The use of social support is an undisputed strategy for success. You don’t need another lecture about the health dangers of being overweight; you need positive motivation to make healthier choices.
  • Start Slow — The goal is to start exercising little by little, not to overdo it and end up frustrated, burnt out, or hurt right away. Gentle, easy exercise is the way to begin!

Just as not exercising becomes a routine, so can doing simple and easy workouts. Soon you’ll be craving something a little more challenging. Listen to your body and be aware of problems, but the bottom line is that most of us can do some kind of physical activity to make us healthier.



Let’s Not Sugar Coat It – Carbs Get a Bad Rap

Over the past few years, carbohydrates, especially refined sugar, have gotten a bad reputation. Unfortunately, an “all-or-nothing” restriction could be causing many people to eventually binge on these foods, often leading to weight gain and the problems that accompany obesity. Despite the messages in the media about the dangers of carbs and sugars, it is important to remember that not all carbohydrates are bad.

As a matter of fact, to boost your metabolism and ultimately lose weight, one must incorporate good carbs into their daily diet. Good carbs provide vital nutrients and essential fibers and help you stay full.

What are good carbs?

Good carbs are complex carbs that provide energy and nutritional value. For example, whole grains like quinoa, barley, faro, brown rice, and vegetables like sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts, or artichokes. Whole grain breads and pastas are easy to incorporate into your diet. These foods will keep you energized for a long period of time and are a healthy staple to any meal.

What are bad carbs?

Bad carbs are refined carbs, often filled with added sugar and devoid of nutritional photo-1458938354258-3e66eb36eb7bvalue. Examples of these would include foods containing refined grains like white rice and foods containing white flour like bread, pasta, and pastries. Bad carbs will provide temporary relief of hunger, but since the nutritional value is so low, the feeling of fullness is short-lived.

Remember, carbs do have their value, and that value should not be underestimated. Whole grains are reliable suppliers of energy; they take longer to break down than refined carbs, and they help make you feel fuller and more satisfied. Whole-grain carbs, when taken in the right portions, are not usually the issue when it comes to weight gain.

Also remember that no diet is perfect. While a well-balanced diet should predominantly include complex carbohydrates, eating simple carbohydrates in moderation will not necessarily make you gain weight or cause chronic diseases.

According to the American Heart Association, women should have no more than six teaspoons of sugar a day and men should have no more than nine. Consuming large amounts of refined sugar is hard on your whole body. It can cause weight gain, high cholesterol, and diabetes, but it also effects mood, sleep, skin, and digestion.

If you are looking for ways to treat severe obesity, schedule a consultation at VIPSurg. Our doctors are experts at bariatric surgery and can help find the right treatment for you.

How Much Water is Enough?

You may have heard that you should aim to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day. How much you should actually drink is more individualized than you might think. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) currently recommends that men should drink at least 104 ounces of water per day, which is 13 cups.

They say women should drink at least 72 ounces, which is 9 cups. Even still, the answer to exactly how much water you should drink isn’t so simple.

While the eight glasses rule is a good start, it isn’t based on solid, well-researched information. Your body weight is made up of 60 percent water. While every system in your body needs water to function, your recommended intake is based on factors including your sex, age, activity level, and others, such as if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding.

The current IOM recommendation for people ages 19 and older is around 3.7 liters for men and 2.7 liters for women. However, this is your overall fluid intake per day, including anything you eat or drink containing water in it, like fruits or vegetables.

Of this total, men should drink around 13 cups from beverages. For women, it’s 9 cups.
If you find it challenging to get in all that water each day, here are a few tips to help:

  • Measure out the water you plan to drink for the day. This gives you a visual reminder as well as lets you see your progress throughout the day.
  • Have a plan. Have a certain amount you want to get in by lunch time. Set aside what is left for the afternoon, perhaps making it so there will be a smaller amount remaining for the early evening.
  • As you sip your way through the day if you find you’re not going to make it, add some fresh squeezed lemon to your water and a few drops of natural sweetener.

In addition to the general health benefits of proper hydration, for years, dieters have been drinking lots of water as a weight loss strategy. While water doesn’t have any magical effect on weight loss, substituting it for higher calorie beverages can certainly help. Also, food with high water content tends to look larger, its higher volume requires more chewing, and it is absorbed more slowly by the body, which helps you feel full. Water-rich foods include fruits, vegetables, broth-based soups, oatmeal, and beans.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are interested in bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with VIPSurg. Drs. Tsuda and Ryan are ready to help you find the right solution for your unique situation.

person drinking water

Defining Obesity

To define what obesity means today, we can’t count on a dictionary. However, since obesity has become a growing national health problem in the U.S., it has perhaps never been more important that we have a working definition that we can all agree on.

In order to understand how someone is categorized as overweight or obese, the world’s health organizations have adopted the use of body mass index (BMI) to classify and communicate about body weight. BMI is a widely recognized weight-for-height index.

Unfortunately, this index does not quantify total body fat or convey information concerning regional distribution of fat — both of which are key to how obesity affects health. Nonetheless, BMI is an easily obtained measure that has been recommended for use in all age groups. Most clinical studies assessing the health effects of overweight and obesity rely on BMI.

Currently, the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization use the same measures of BMI for defining overweight. obese-3011213__340 (2)

  • If BMI is 25.0 to <30, it falls within the overweight range.
  • If BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the obese range.

Since BMI describes body weight relative to height, it correlates strongly (in adults) with total body fat content. However, some very muscular people may have a high BMI without undue health risks.

Obesity is often from a combination of factors, based on both genetics and behavior. Accordingly, treating obesity usually requires more than just dietary changes.

Being overweight is a significant contributor to health problems. It increases the risk of developing a number of diseases including:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Heart attack
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Cancer (certain forms such as cancer of the prostate and cancer of the colon and rectum)
  • Gallstones and gall bladder disease
  • Gout and arthritis
  • Osteoarthritis (degenerative arthritis) of the knees, hips, and the lower back
  • Sleep apnea

Ideally, health-oriented definitions of overweight and obesity should be used that are based on the amount of excess body fat that puts an individual at a higher risk for health problems. Unfortunately, no such definition currently exists. Health risks associated with increasing weight are part of a continuum. People can have weight-associated health problems at BMIs lower than 25, and others can have no identifiable health problems at BMIs significantly greater than 25.

Easily determine your BMI with this free calculator:

If you’re interested in bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with us. Our team of experts can find the right treatment for you.

What is Metabolic Syndrome

Nearly 35% of all U.S. adults and an astounding 50% of those 60 years of age or older are estimated to have a syndrome that makes them twice as likely to develop heart disease and 5 times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn’t have this syndrome. The disorder is called metabolic syndrome, and it involves a group of 5 risk factors that increase the risks of developing several potentially deadly conditions.

What is metabolic syndrome?

It’s a group of risk factors that increases the likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. The 5 risk factors are:

  • increased blood pressure
  • high blood sugar levels
  • excess fat around the waist
  • high triglyceride levels
  • low levels of good cholesterol, or HDL

Having one of these risk factors alone doesn’t mean one has metabolic syndrome. However, having just one does increase the chances of developing cardiovascular disease. Having three or more of these factors is considered as having metabolic syndrome.

What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome?

The risk factors are related mostly to obesity. The two most important risk factors are defined by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute as:

  • excess fat around the middle and upper parts of the body
  • insulin resistance, which makes it difficult for the body to use sugar

Other factors that can increase risk for metabolic syndrome include:

  • age
  • family history of metabolic syndrome
  • not getting enough exercise
  • women with polycystic ovary syndrome

What are the complications of metabolic syndrome?

Complications that can result from metabolic syndrome are often grave and chronic. Obesity concept in x-rayThey include:

  • hardening of the arteries
  • diabetes
  • heart attack
  • kidney disease
  • stroke
  • nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • peripheral artery disease
  • cardiovascular disease

If diabetes develops, additional health complications may result including:

  • eye damage
  • nerve damage
  • kidney disease
  • amputation of limbs

How is metabolic syndrome treated?

If you are diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, your doctor will probably recommend lifestyle changes that may include losing between 7-10% of your current weight and getting at least 30 minutes of moderate to intense exercise five to seven days a week. They may also suggest that you quit smoking.

Your doctor may prescribe medications to help reduce your risk of stroke and heart attack.

What is the outlook for patients with metabolic syndrome?

People who take their doctor’s advice and lose weight will reduce their chances of developing serious health problems such as heart attack or stroke. However, for many who are obese and haven’t been successful with diet changes and exercising, more intensive treatment like bariatric surgery might be needed.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule a consultation at VIPSurg. Our doctors and team of experts can help find the right treatment for you.


LINX: A Small Device Getting Big Results

Most of us experience heartburn or indigestion once in a while. Sometimes it comes from overeating; other times it happens from eating or drinking something acidic or spicy which irritates the digestive tract. Frequent heartburn, however, can be a sign of a more serious disorder known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is a digestive disorder that affects the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), which is the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach. While GERD can often be controlled with diet changes and/or medication, more severe cases require surgery. The LINX device and procedure is changing the lives of people who suffer from chronic GERD.

Doctors believe that some people suffer from GERD due to a condition called hiatal hernia. A hiatal hernia occurs when the upper part of the stomach bulges through the diaphragm muscle which separates the abdomen and chest.

The diaphragm has a small opening (hiatus) through which the esophagus passes before connecting to the stomach. With a hiatal hernia, the stomach pushes up through that opening and into the chest.

A small hiatal hernia usually doesn’t cause problems. You might never even know you have one unless your doctor discovers it when checking for another condition. A large hiatal hernia, however, can allow food and acid to back up into the esophagus, leading to heartburn.

You might think that although heartburn can be very uncomfortable and even quite painful, surgery seems like an aggressive treatment for a common condition. Unfortunately, the long-term effects of GERD can be increasingly serious.

Left untreated, GERD can cause:

  • Esophagitis – inflammation of the esophagus.
  • Esophageal stricture – the esophagus becomes narrow, making it difficult to swallow.
  • Barrett’s esophagus – the cells lining the esophagus change into cells similar to the lining of the intestine. This can develop into cancer.
  • Respiratory problems – it is possible to breathe stomach acid into the lungs, which can cause a range of problems including chest congestion, hoarseness, asthma, laryngitis, and pneumonia.

Fortunately, when changes in lifestyle, diet, and medication don’t help, there is a Actual size.Actual benefits are immeasurable.minimally invasive procedure that is having life-changing results for GERD patients. It’s called LINX. This simple ring of titanium magnets is a small device that brings big results.

LINX is easy to understand and love because it is simple. The beauty of this quarter-sized device is that it does exactly what your failing LES is supposed to do — prevent stomach acid from entering your esophagus.

Why is LINX so great?

  • Unlike other procedures to treat reflux, LINX is implanted around the outside of the LES and requires no alteration to the stomach.
  • LINX preserves normal physiological function so you can belch or vomit as needed. The titanium beads open and close to let food down, and if it needs to come up, it can.
  • Designed for a lifetime. LINX is constructed of titanium, and the permanent magnets mean LINX will be working for you for the long haul.
  • Designed for everyday life. The device will not affect airport security. And you can still have an MRI.
  • LINX is designed to start working the moment the device is implanted.

Are you ready to take back control of your digestive health? LINX is intended for patients diagnosed with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), and who are seeking an alternative to continuous acid suppression therapy. Are you concerned with a lifetime of medication, pharmacy visits, and potential side effects? If this sounds like you, and you live in the Las Vegas area, schedule a consultation at VIP Surg. LINX can change your life.





Resolve to Happy and Healthy in 2018

The new year can be an exciting time — the promise of new beginnings and fresh starts. It’s also a good time to recommit to your health and well-being. Creating health resolutions is easy enough. Sticking to them past the month of January, however, is another story.

These are the resolutions health professionals wish you would make and keep in 2018:

  • Practice mindful eating – In these days of technology and devices, it’s common to eat with your eyes glued to a screen. Unfortunately, distracted eating often leads to overeating. Slow down and pay attention to your food, pausing to put down the fork or spoon between bites. It’s easier to notice when you feel full, plus you’re more likely to enjoy the foods you eat. Resolve to cut down on guilty pleasures, but don’t prohibit them completely. Enjoy your cravings once in a while, and it will make staying on track the rest of the time easier.
  • Chill out and rest up — According to Johns Hopkins sleep expert Rachel Salas, M.D., when it’s time to sleep, it’s time to chill – literally. Lowering the thermostat to 68 degrees or colder before you tuck into bed can help you sleep better. Darken your room by drawing the curtains or dimming the display on your alarm clock to really get that quality sleep. If vowing to get eight hours of sleep every night is totally unrealistic, tell yourself you’ll go to bed 15 minutes earlier than your usual 2018 goals listbedtime. Keep shifting that number earlier and earlier. If you keep doing it, eventually you will be going to sleep at an hour that makes better sense for your life.
  • Be grateful — Take some time at the beginning or end of the day to reflect on what you’re grateful for. Reminding ourselves of the small, everyday positive aspects of our lives helps to develop a sense of balance and perspective that can enhance well-being. Research has shown that those who regularly journal what they’re grateful for sleep better, work out more, and visit the doctor less. If keeping a journal isn’t for you, you can download gratitude-centric apps for your smartphone.
  • Find 30 minutes a day to walk — Getting the recommended 30 minutes of exercise each day can be as simple as taking a walk. If you’re very busy, take three 10-minute walks throughout your day. Make it fun! Grab a partner at work to get you through your lunch routine, or have a friend or family member meet you for an evening stroll. Instead of worrying about working out during the week, focus on accumulating more steps during your day-to-day activities. Even 500 extra steps for five days can lead to significant changes. You can schedule breaks during the day to stroll around the block or walk to your coworkers’ desks instead of emailing. This way, you’re focusing on overall wellness rather than just shedding pounds. Making small, daily changes such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator may seem minor, but they can make a big difference for your heart in the long run.

Happy, Healthy, New Year from all of us at VIP Surg!