What you Need to Know about Protein

You probably know you need to eat protein, but what is it and where exactly do you find it? The answer is – everywhere – if you’re talking about the body. Proteins make up about 42% of the dry weight of our bodies. The protein collagen—which holds our skin, tendons, muscles, and bones together—makes up about a quarter of the body’s total protein. Protein builds, maintains, and replaces the tissues in your body. Your muscles, your organs, and your immune system are made up mostly of protein. All of our cells and even blood are packed with protein molecules.

Proteins, along with fats and carbohydrates, are the macronutrients that form the basis of our diets. Once consumed, some people associate protein only with helping to build muscle, but keep in mind that’s not all it does for us. In our bodies, protein performs a range of duties, from building new cells to regulating metabolism to helping cells communicate. Proteins help shuttle oxygen throughout the body in the form of hemoglobin, as well as build muscle.

When you eat foods that contain protein, the digestive juices in your stomach and intestine go to work. They break down the protein in food into basic units, called amino acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins your body needs to maintain muscles, bones, blood, and body organs.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. Our DNA directs the body to join various combinations of amino acids into a variety of sequences and three-dimensional shapes for an arsenal of over 2 million different proteins, each serving a unique function. Our bodies can make some of these amino acids, but there are nine that are considered “essential amino acids” because we must consume these through our diet.

Many foods contain protein, but the best sources are:

  • Beef
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • dairy products
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • legumes like black beans and lentils

While our bodies can store fats and carbohydrates to draw on when needed, we do not have a storage pool of amino acids. We need a fresh source each day in order to build the body proteins we need. If the body is missing a particular amino acid to form the protein it needs, it will pull that amino acid by breaking down existing muscle protein. If we consistently lack certain amino acids we will lose muscle weight, energy and, eventually, fundamental functions.

The amount of protein you need depends on your weight and health. The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for protein for the healthy individual is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight or 3 to 4 grams per 10 pounds, and two to three servings of protein-rich food will meet the daily needs of most adults. Athlete’s protein intake recommendations may be higher.

The good news is that you don’t have to eat all the essential amino acids in every meal. As long as you have a variety of protein sources throughout the day, your body will grab what it needs from each meal.

You can look at a food label to find out how many protein grams are in a serving, but if you’re eating a balanced diet, you don’t need to keep track of it. It’s pretty easy to get enough protein.

*Dr. Shawn Tsuda is a General Surgeon specializing in robotic bariatric surgery. Schedule a consultation to learn more.
gabel mit verschieden Proteinen

Advertisements

Heartburn or GERD – It makes a Difference

Acid reflux occurs when stomach contents moves backward into the esophagus. It’s also called acid regurgitation or gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). Acid reflux is a common digestive condition. According to the American College of Gastroenterology, more than 60 million Americans experience acid reflux at least once a month. More than 15 million Americans experience it every day.

Acid reflux usually causes a burning sensation in the chest. The sensation radiates up from the stomach to the mid-chest or throat. This is also known as heartburn. When symptoms that seem like heartburn persist, it could be a disease with more serious consequences. Chronic reflux can sometimes lead to difficulty swallowing and in some cases it can even cause breathing problems like asthma.

Acid reflux is caused when the muscle at the end of the esophagus, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is faulty or weak. The LES is a one-way valve that normally opens for limited amounts of time when you swallow. Acid reflux occurs when the LES doesn’t close properly or tightly enough. A faulty or weakened LES allows digestive juices and stomach contents to rise back up into the esophagus.

Large meals that cause the stomach to stretch a lot can temporarily loosen the LES. Other factors associated with reflux include:

  • obesity
  • stress
  • hiatal hernia (when part of the stomach pushes up through the diaphragm)
  • consuming particular foods (particularly carbonated beverages, coffee, and chocolate)

Most people experience occasional acid reflux or GERD. However, in some cases the digestive condition is chronic.

Acid reflux can affect infants and children as well as adults. Children under 12 usually don’t experience heartburn. Instead they have alternative symptoms like:

  • trouble swallowing
  • dry cough
  • asthma
  • laryngitis (loss of voice)

These alternative symptoms can also appear in adults.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a chronic digestive disease. It’s the more serious form of GERD and can eventually cause more serious health problems if left untreated. Acid reflux that occurs more than twice a week and causes inflammation of the esophagus is considered to be GERD.

Most people with GERD experience symptoms such as:

  • heartburn
  • regurgitation
  • trouble swallowing
  • a feeling of excessive fullness

Living with acid reflux is inconvenient. Fortunately, symptoms can generally be controlled through:

  • stopping smoking
  • reducing alcohol consumption
  • eating less fat
  • avoiding foods that set off attacks
  • losing weight
  • sleeping in different positions
  • antacids
  • anti-reflux medication
  • surgery

Most people with reflux will not have long-term health problems. However, GERD can increase the risk of Barrett’s esophagus. This is a permanent change in the lining of the esophagus which increases the risk of esophageal cancer.

If you suffer from GERD that isn’t responding to treatment, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda to learn about LINX http://www.linxforlife.com/. This could be the answer you’ve been searching for.

Stethoscope on notebook and pencil with GERD (Gastroesophageal R

 

Weight-loss Surgery Myths – Setting the Record Straight

If you are considering bariatric surgery, you’ve probably heard many of the popular myths. These run the gamut from horror stories to fairy tales. In reality, these procedures are neither as awful nor as fantastic as they’re made out to be. Here are some facts to help set the record straight about weight-loss surgery (WLS).

Myth: All bariatric surgery involves stomach stapling.

  • There are many different types of gastrointestinal procedures for weight loss, some of which reduce the functioning size of the stomach and others that bypass parts of the digestive tract, reducing absorption of calories and nutrients. Different types of surgeries offer different results, and some are more suitable for particular people than others.

Myth: People who get weight-loss surgery don’t have willpower.

  • Many bariatric surgery patients have struggled for years, pushing themselves to extremes to lose weight and keep it off. They understand that surgery is a final option when everything else has failed. The surgery, recovery and lifestyle changes that accompany WLS require both courage and determination on the part of the patient.

Myth:  Bariatric surgery is only for the morbidly obese.

  • Obesity is only one of the criteria that qualify patients for surgery. Overweight patients may also be candidates if they have one or more health problems that might be reduced or alleviated by weight loss such as diabetes, sleep apnea, hypertension, arthritis, and high cholesterol.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is extremely dangerous.

  • Any type of surgery has associated risks, such as complications or even death. However, a number of recent advances have helped to minimize risks. Surgeries are usually done laparoscopically with mini-incisions that result in faster healing, less pain, and less scarring.

Myth: You will finally be skinny after bariatric surgery.

  • Losing just 50% of excess weight and keeping it off is considered a success story. That’s still going to be overweight in the eyes of most people. Plus, your skin isn’t necessarily going to tone up and be free of drooping after weight loss. However, the health benefits in reducing weight-related problems like sleep apnea often occur even in patients who don’t lose all the weight they would like.

Myth: Weight loss from bariatric surgery is permanent.

  • Unfortunately, even this one is not true. In fact, some regain is likely. Part of this is simply the body adjusting and learning to store fat even on a very restricted diet. At other times, a patient’s failure to adhere to the post-surgery lifestyle recommendations plays a role.

Myth: You should only have WLS if you are done having kids.

  • It isn’t safe to get pregnant in the first year or two after bariatric surgery. You simply won’t be getting enough nutrients to support a growing fetus. After you are done losing weight (if you are taking all your supplements and monitoring your health carefully), getting pregnant should be okay. This is something to discuss with your bariatric surgeon.

Myth: After bariatric surgery, you won’t be able to eat anything that tastes good.

  • Patients who undergo gastric bypass may need to avoid very sweet foods because it can cause side effects like dizziness and nausea. Patients who have a duodenal switch typically need to keep fatty foods to a minimum. However, many patients can and do eat their favorite foods after they recover from surgery. They just eat very small portions.

Myth: You can never be far from a bathroom after WLS.

  • In the aftermath of surgery, you may find yourself having some “emergency” bathroom visits. However, symptoms like diarrhea and vomiting should subside over time as you get a better handle on how your altered digestive system responds to food.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is reversible.

  • Gastric banding is usually reversible. That’s because the stomach and intestines are not cut or stapled with this surgery. Gastric bypass may be reversible, but this is a very involved surgery. It’s more difficult to put everything back where it was, and there is a risk that the revision won’t restore normal function. Sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal switch entail actual removal of part of the stomach without reattaching it lower on the intestine. This type of surgery is not reversible.

Surgery for weight reduction is not a miracle procedure. Weight loss surgery is designed to assist the morbidly obese in developing a healthier lifestyle. A surgical weight loss operation is a useful tool for weight loss, but it is a surgical procedure that requires a substantial lifelong commitment. The surgery alone will not help someone lose weight and keep it off. The patient must change eating and exercise habits. Without changes to the daily pattern of eating and activity, the patient is likely to regain the weight over time.

 

Reboot your Exercise Routine for Spring

With warmer temperatures and sunny days, spring is the ideal time to reboot your exercise schedule. Your favorite running trails are calling, and suddenly, those morning fitness classes don’t seem too early. Most of you have been working hard in the gym since you committed to your New Year’s goals, and the weekly treadmill and indoor aerobic classes may have lost their appeal. If you’re ready for some fun and fresh exercise changes to keep you motivated, try just a few changes to your weekly routine, and you’ll be reinvigorated to stick to your fitness goals and jump into the spring season.

  • Get outside
    • Get off the treadmill once or twice a week and take your cardio outdoors.
    • exercising outdoors may improve energy levels and decrease stress to a greater extent than working out inside.

If taking your workout out of the gym doesn’t work for you, there are still plenty of ways to get out of an exercise rut:

  • If you do spinning, try yoga.
    • Cycling is predominantly a cardiovascular activity that is focused on the lower body and core. Yoga poses will strengthen your upper body, reverse the postural imbalance of the forward flexion associated with cycling and open up your hips for a more mobile body (and will make your cycling classes more productive!).
  • If you do yoga, try resistance training.Spring flatlay composition with sport equipment and tulips.
    • Throw in some dumbbells, resistance bands, kettlebells, or Body Bars — anything to add in external resistance to a workout. Yoga is definitely a strength builder, but rock your workout by trying integrated and compound resistance training to build lean muscle.
  • If you do Pilates, try high intensity interval training (aka HIIT).
    • A major portion of Pilates programming is either performed on a mat or specialized equipment and often lacks a metabolic component. Adding some high intensity interval training will boost metabolism, increase aerobic capacity, and aid in weight management.

The possibilities are endless. Inside or outside? Yoga or cycling? In the end, you don’t have to choose just one. Some workout groups exist entirely outdoors, and spring is a great time to try one of those. The truth is that mixing up indoor and outdoor sessions and different types of activities is a great way to keep exercise exciting and fun.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are looking for a weight-loss surgeon, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for a consultation. He and his expert team will help find the right treatment for you.