Information is Power: Knowing What to Expect After Bariatric Surgery

Food Phase 3

During this phase after bariatric surgery, you will transition to more solid foods. This may include soft meat, fish, chicken, cereals, cooked vegetables, and canned fresh fruits.

Your doctor will have you continue to:

  • Incorporate high protein foods into your diet and consume them first at meals.
    • Women: 50–60 grams of protein
    • Men: 60–70 grams of protein
  • Take a chewable vitamin supplement with minerals.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, 48–64 ounces (six to eight, 8-ounce cups) per day.

Post Bariatric Surgery Meal Plan for Phase 3: Adaptive/Soft Diet

  • Consume three small meals each day.
  • Add a variety of low fat, low calorie starches, fruits, and vegetables to your diet, as tolerated.
  • Avoid skins and seeds on fruits and vegetables.
  • Avoid breads.
  • Chew foods thoroughly.
  • Stop eating whenever you feel full.
  • Continue using protein supplements after each meal to meet your daily protein requirements.
  • Liquids between meals
    • Wait at least 30 minutes after each meal. Then consume an 8 ounce protein supplement or shake, followed by 16 ounces of sugar free, clear liquids.
    • Try to spread fluids out over a three-hour period.
    • Stop drinking at least 30 minutes before mealtime.

In addition to the foods listed on the pureed diet (see last week’s blog post), begin introducing the following foods to your diet.

  • Protein Sourcesclose up of different food items on table
    • All varieties of fish and shellfish
    • Turkey breast or chicken breast (chopped, white meat)
    • Low fat deli lunchmeats
    • Sliced or grated low fat cheese (5 grams of fat or less)
    • Hard boiled or poached eggs
    • Soups (dilute with skim milk or add finely minced meats)
  • Grains/starches
    • Hot cereals
    • Unsweetened cereals softened in skim milk
    • Baked potatoes, sweet potatoes, or yams
    • Boiled pasta, noodles, or white rice
  • Fruits/vegetables
    • Canned fruit (in own juices or water packed)
    • Soft, fresh fruit without skins (apples, pears, peaches)
    • Bananas
    • Cooked or canned vegetables
    • Avoid raw, fibrous vegetables like broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Avoid skins and seeds.

Next week our series continues as we discuss the next phase of eating after bariatric surgery. Read more online at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/bariatric-surgery/in-depth/gastric-bypass-diet/art-20048472

Bariatric surgery is not a quick fix to obesity and related health problems, but if you are willing to make a change that could save your life, it might be right for you. If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with Dr. Heidi Ryan.

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Fighting Obesity with Bariatric Surgery

Obesity is no longer considered a cosmetic issue that is caused by overeating and a lack of self-control. The World Health Organization along with National and International medical and scientific societies, now recognize obesity as a chronic progressive disease resulting from multiple environmental and genetic factors.

Weight gain also contributes to the development of other diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, and depression, and these conditions are often Feet on bathroom scale with word "Help" on dialtreated with medications that contribute to even further weight gain. In all of these ways and more, obesity begets obesity, trapping the individual in a vicious weight-gain cycle.

Individuals affected by severe obesity are resistant to long-term weight loss by diet and exercise. The National Institute of Health recognizes that long-term weight loss, or in other words, the ability to maintain weight loss, is nearly impossible for those affected by severe obesity by any means other than metabolic and bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgeries are effective in maintaining long-term weight loss.

Weight-loss surgery is surgery on your stomach (and sometimes intestine) to help you lose weight. Weight-loss surgery is not surgery to remove fat.

Weight-loss surgery can work by:

  • Limiting the amount of food you can eat at one time
  • Changing the way your food is digested so fewer calories and nutrients are absorbed
  • Causing hormone changes that lessen your appetite

Doctors may suggest weight-loss surgery to people with a BMI above 40 or people with a BMI of 35 or higher who have a serious health problem because of their weight (such as diabetes, sleep apnea, or high blood pressure). However, weight-loss surgery may also help people at lower levels of obesity (a BMI between 30 and 35) who have diabetes or prediabetes.

Three common types of weight-loss surgery are:

  • Adjustable gastric band
  • Sleeve gastrectomy
  • Gastric bypass

Read more online at: https://asmbs.org/patients

If you are considering bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for a consultation. He and his team of experts can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

Information is Power: Knowing What to Expect After Bariatric Surgery

Food Phase Two

Once you receive your surgeon’s okay to progress to foods with a thicker consistency after your bariatric surgery, you can begin pureeing your foods. This will mean the following:

  • Incorporate high protein foods into your diet.
  • Women: 50–60 grams of protein
  • Men: 60–70 grams of protein
  • Start taking your chewable vitamin supplement with minerals.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, 48–64 ounces per day.

The pureed diet following bariatric surgery typically includes:

  • Consuming three small meals each day.
  • Protein supplements
  • Liquids between meals
  • Wait at least 30 minutes after each meal. Then consume an 8 ounce protein supplement or shake, followed by 16 ounces of sugar free, clear liquids.
  • Try to spread fluids out over a three-hour period.
  • Stop drinking at least 30 minutes before mealtime.

Suggested protein sources for a pureed diet include:

  • Yogurt (plain or sugar free, low or nonfat, blended without fruit chunks)
  • Strained cream soups (celery, potato, mushroom, or chicken made with skim milk)
  • Skim milk with 1/2 scoop protein powder
  • Protein supplements added to food or water for extra protein
  • Mashed cottage cheese
  • Ricotta chesse
  • Scrambled eggs or egg substitute
  • Pureed beef, chicken, or turkey
  • Baby food meats
  • White fish mashed with a fork

Various vegetables and fruits can also be pureed and consumed during this phase as well.

Pureed food should be the consistency of baby food. To achieve this:

  • Cut food into small pieces and place in blender or food processor
  • Add liquid (broth, low calorie gravy or skim milk)
  • Puree until smooth
  • Season food to taste

Staying hydrated is key. Here are some tips:

  • Sip all fluids slowly to prevent nausea and vomiting.
  • Carry a water bottle with you everywhere.
  • Other liquids to help maintain hydration include decaffeinated coffee and tea, broth, and sugar free fruit juices with artificial sweeteners.

Read more online at: http://bariatrics.ucla.edu/workfiles/UCLA-Bariatric-postoperative-diet-instructions.pdf

Next week our series continues as we discuss the next phase of eating after bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery is not a quick fix to obesity and related health problems, but if you are willing to make a change that could save your life, it might be right for you. If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with Dr. Heidi Ryan.
Baby food

Finding Potential Solutions for Severe Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity is a serious medical condition that affects children and adolescents. It occurs when a child is well above the normal weight for his or her age and height. This is particularly troubling because the extra pounds often start children on the path to health problems that were once confined to adults, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Childhood obesity can also lead to poor self-esteem and depression.

Bariatric surgery is sometimes used to treat youth with extreme obesity. Although it is Surpoids et mal trebecoming clear that teens can lose weight after bariatric surgery, many questions still exist about the long-term effects on teens’ developing bodies and minds.

Who is a good youth candidate for surgery? Experts in childhood obesity and bariatric surgery suggest that families consider surgery only after youth have tried for at least 6 months to lose weight and have not had success.

Candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Have extreme obesity (BMI > 40 )
  • Be their adult height (usually at age 13 or older for girls and 15 or older for boys)
  • Have serious health problems linked to weight, such as type 2 diabetes or sleep apnea, that may improve with bariatric surgery

In addition, health care providers should assess potential patients and their parents to see how emotionally prepared they are for the surgery and the lifestyle changes they will need to make.

Mounting evidence suggests that bariatric surgery can favorably change both the weight and health of youth with extreme obesity. Over the years gastric bypass surgery has been the main operation used to treat extreme obesity in youth. A review of short-term data from the largest inpatient database in the United States suggests that these surgeries are at least as safe for youth as adults.

If you’re looking for a bariatric expert in the Las Vegas area, schedule a consultation with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his team can find the right treatment for you.

Read more online at: https://asmbs.org/resources/pediatric-best-practice-guidelines

Information is Power: Knowing What to Expect After Bariatric Surgery

Food Phase 1

Gastric bypass surgery can be a lifesaving procedure. Weight loss and the reduction of ailments associated with obesity can help you live longer and feel and look better. To be successful long-term, however, you will have to change your diet. But before we talk about the way you should eat for the rest of your life, you have to get through the period directly after surgery.

Your diet for the first five weeks after gastric bypass surgery is important for two reasons:

  1. Your safety. Eating the wrong food could put undue pressure on your healing stomach.
  2. Resetting your bad eating habits and replacing them with new healthy habits.

Diet recommendations after gastric bypass surgery vary depending on where the surgery is performed and your individual situation, but a gastric bypass diet typically follows a staged approach to help you ease back into eating solid foods as you recover. How quickly you move from one step to the next depends on how fast your body heals and adjusts to the change in eating patterns. You can usually start eating regular foods about three months after surgery. After gastric bypass surgery, you must be careful to drink enough fluids to avoid dehydration, and to pay extra attention to signs that you feel hungry or full.

Phase One

Within the first day or two after surgery, you’ll begin taking small sips or spoonsful of clear liquids. Choose fluids without sugar, caffeine or carbonation. Good choices include but aren’t limited to:

  • brothTea with sage in a glass on rustic background.
  • apple juice
  • gelatin
  • water
  • tea
  • instant drink mixes
  • ice pops

A few days or up to a week later, you’ll be allowed to add full liquids — foods that pass through a strainer at room temperature — to your diet. Choose sugar-free, caffeine-free, non-carbonated liquids, such as:

  • strained cream soups
  • orange juice
  • commercially-prepared high protein drinks
  • pudding
  • yogurt

You’ll have to continue on a liquid diet for at least the first few weeks post surgery until your doctor allows you to move on to the next phase.

Read more online at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/bariatric-surgery/in-depth/gastric-bypass-diet/art-20048472

Next week our series continues, and our blog will focus on phase 2 after weight loss surgery — pureed foods.

If you live in the Las Vegas area and are considering bariatric surgery, schedule an appointment with the area’s first female bariatric surgeon, Dr. Heidi Ryan.

 

Finding the Path to Lowering Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a serious and common condition that can lead to life-threatening diseases such as heart attack, stroke, heart or kidney failure, and more. Blood pressure is measured by two numbers: the top number is the systolic pressure (when the heart is pumping blood) and the bottom number is the diastolic pressure (when the heart is at rest). A normal blood pressure number is below 120/80, prehypertension is diagnosed between 120/80 – 139/89, Stage 1 hypertension is between 140/90 – 159/99, and Stage 2 hypertension is blood pressure above 160/100.

Most doctors prescribe drug treatment when a patient has reached the prehypertension Fast-food and medical toolsstage. Much like high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure (even in the prehypertension stage) is a sure sign of other problems going on in the body. However, by addressing underlying issues with diet and lifestyle changes, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure without resorting to drug treatment.

Here are some tips to get you started on the path to lower blood pressure:

  • Reduce excessive carbohydrate intake, especially refined carbs and sugars.
    • One of the most significant contributors to high blood pressure is high blood sugar and insulin resistance.
    • Chronically high blood sugar, hyperinsulinemia, and high triglycerides are far more common in individuals with hypertension than those with normal blood pressure, and one of the major contributors to all three of these conditions is an excess intake of carbohydrate, particularly refined grains and sugars.
    • Excess intake of sugar-sweetened beverages like soda, sweet tea, and other sugary drinks has been shown to directly influence blood pressure.
  • Increase intake of beneficial minerals like potassium, magnesium, and calcium.
    • Focusing on eating foods rich in other macrominerals is more beneficial than strictly focusing on avoiding sodium. More important than overall sodium intake is the sodium-to-potassium ratio.
    • Don’t go too low carb when reducing your carbohydrate intake – many of the best sources of potassium and magnesium are starchy vegetables like white and sweet potatoes or fruits like plantains and bananas.
  • Eat more fatty fish.
    • Fatty fish is high in essential omega-3 fats, and these fats have been shown to reduce the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular events in multiple studies.
    • Eating 16 ounces a week of fatty fish like salmon, sardines, halibut, and mackerel is an important dietary strategy for reducing both high blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Read more online at: http://bit.ly/1Op82cl

If you are considering bariatric surgery in the Las Vegas area, schedule an appointment with Dr. Shawn Tsuda. He and his expert team can help you find the right treatment for your unique situation.

Get Past GERD at The Specialized Heartburn & Acid Reflux Center from miVIP Surgery Centers

miVIP_Acid_Heartburn

If you suffer from severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), you know how it can interfere with your normal daily life. However, if you live in the Las Vegas, Nevada area, you have a wonderful option for treatment. The Specialized Heartburn and Acid Reflux Center from miVIP Surgery Centers delivers the latest, most comprehensive diagnostic and treatment options for gastrointestinal conditions. We employ state-of-the art technology and innovative, minimally invasive surgical options, including the latest robotic procedures, to diagnose and treat the full range of gastrointestinal (GI) conditions in an outpatient setting. Patients will also receive the exceptional care and personal attention for which miVIP Surgery Centers are known.

Dr. Shawn Tsuda is excited to be a part of this team of experts, and he is a board-certified general surgeon with fellowship training in minimally invasive gastrointestinal and bariatric surgery. Dr. Tsuda is an expert in surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In fact, Dr. Tsuda was the first surgeon in Nevada to be certified in the LINX Reflux Management System procedure, the very latest surgical advance for patients with severe GERD.

A leader and innovator in all areas of minimally invasive and robotic surgery, Dr. Tsuda is also skilled at other surgical procedures for GERD, including Nissen Fundoplication and hiatal hernia repair. He has performed hundreds of such procedures with excellent outcomes.

Reducing your stress can help improve your outcome, so patients at the Specialized Heartburn and Acid Reflux Center from miVIP Surgery Centers enjoy the convenience of “one-stop” access to comprehensive diagnostic and treatment options for GI conditions – all in one location.

Our highly trained and skilled medical team has every resource they need to accurately diagnose and treat everything from heartburn, acid reflux, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), to more serious conditions like esophagitis, Barrett’s Esophagus, and esophageal cancer. We’re also prepared to solve such associated conditions as obesity, sleep apnea, dental erosions and cavities, asthma, and adverse side effects of long-term antacid and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use.

Some of the services that set the Heartburn and Acid Reflux Center apart include:

  • In-depth, pre-operative assessment by our highly trained and skilled surgical team
  • Consistent care from a dedicated, constant, and well-defined team of trained operating room staff
  • Advanced theater equipment, including the latest da Vinci Si robot/laparoscopic kit and specialist operating tables
  • The utmost respect for every individual’s dignity at all times
  • Advanced recovery room with a private nurse providing one-to-one care
  • Personal patient care advocate and program coordinator assigned to each patient
  • World Health Organization (WHO) safety checklist performed before each operation
  • Comprehensive team brief and team debrief held before and after each operating list
  • Senior nursing staff trained and experienced in caring for patients post-bariatric surgery and upper gastrointestinal procedures
  • Clearly defined triggers for escalating any post-operative concerns with a track record of prompt and successful intervention when needed
  • 24-hour telephone access after discharge

If left untreated, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms can worsen over time and even develop into more serious conditions. If you suffer from this miserable condition, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for an appointment, and visit http://www.heartburnandacidreflux.com/about-us/ for more information.