Guide To Weight-Loss Surgery

If you are obese and suffer from any of the dangerous health problems associated with obesity, you may be considering bariatric (weight-loss) surgery to help you lose weight and get on the road to better health. Even if you and your doctors have decided that this is a good option for you, choosing which bariatric procedure can be a bit overwhelming. Learning about them can help calm confusion and fear.

Bariatric Surgery Types

Bariatric surgery contributes to weight loss in two ways:

* Restriction – surgery that physically restricts the amount of food your stomach can hold, which limits the amount of calories you can eat.

* Malabsorption – surgery that shortens or bypasses part of the small intestine, reducing the amount of calories and nutrients the body absorbs.

Two surgery types that work through restriction:

* Adjustable Gastric Banding – a band with an inflatable balloon in it is placed around the upper part of the stomach restricting the amount of food/calories the stomach can hold.

* Sleeve Gastrectomy – a large part of the stomach is actually removed from the body, forming a new, smaller stomach restricting the amount of food/calories and causing less production of the hormone that causes hunger.

Two surgery types that work through malabsorption:

* Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass – a small pouch is created at the top of the stomach, drastically reducing the amount one can comfortably eat. Part of the small intestine is cut and attached to the new pouch. Because food now bypasses part of the small intestine, less calories and nutrients are absorbed.

* Duodenal Switch with Biliopancreatic Diversion – this procedure begins with the surgeon removing a large part of the stomach. The valve that releases food to the small intestine is left, along with duodenum. The middle section of the intestine is closed off and the last part is attached directly to the duodenum. The separated section of the intestine isn’t removed; it’s reattached to the end of the intestine, allowing bile and pancreatic digestive juices to flow into this part of the intestine. Food therefore bypasses most of the small intestine, limiting the absorption of calories and nutrients.

If you are considering weight-loss surgery, contact Dr. Shawn Tsuda for a consultation. Read more online at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/bariatric-surgery/in-depth/weight-loss-surgery/ART-20045334?pg=2

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